Sentry Savannah Recap; 23 May 2018

Savannah – I got back into Savannah from Brunswick yesterday morning just in time to catch the last sorties of the latest Sentry Savannah exercise. It proved to be an interesting morning, with flights of F-15s, F-16s, F-22s, and T-38s being controlled by an E-3 and supported by two KC-135s. After the intercepts were over, a flight of F-22s returned to Langley while the other flights returned to their home base or to Savannah-Hilton Head IAP. After lunch, the rest of the F-22As and the T-38s began returning to Langley as a C-40 began picking up support personnel.

Below is a list of frequencies and callsigns in use during this iteration of Sentry Savannah. I don’t have any photographs to post this time since I wasn’t in town very much and when I was the weather wasn’t very cooperative.

119.100/257.800 – Savannah IAP Tower
124.975/279.575 – Hunter AAF Tower
126.200/285.425 – Hunter AAF Base Ops
120.400/353.775 – Savannah Approach/Departure
125.300/371.875 – Savannah Approach/Departure
118.400/307.225 – Savannah Approach/Departure

256.875/135.450 – Jax Center Keystone Ultra High
277.400/126.750 – Jax Center Brunswick Low
281.550 – Jax Center Georgetown High
282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
285.650/126.125 – Jax Center Statesboro High
290.350/132.425 – Jax Center Hunter Ultra High
306.300/133.450 – Jax Center Florence Low
317.550/134.375 – Jax Center Charleston Low
319.200/127.875 – Jax Center Aiken High
346.300/133.300 – Jax Center Moultrie Ultra High
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Allendale/Savannah Low

120.950/284.500 – SEALORD North Primary
313.700 – SEALORD North Secondary
133.950/267.500 – SEALORD South Primary

288.400 – NORAD Discrete; Check-In
293.600 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
282.600 – AWACS Discrete; Intercepts
254.200 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling
265.400 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling
274.400 – Aerial Refueling
278.000 – Aerial Refueling

228.400 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA

237.000 – ADC Ops; 192nd FW “RAPTOR Ops,” 71st FTS “IRON Ops”
139.2125 ($293) – ADC; 192nd FW/71st FTS MOC
233.525 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
257.075 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
262.025 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
296.900 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
235.900 – 71st FTS Air-to-Air
320.600 – 71st FTS Air-to-Air, Fight Common

251.250 – 125th FW Ops
234.800 – 125th FW Aux 5
253.700 – 125th FW Aux 6
314.200 – 125th FW Aux 7

311.200 – 55th FS Ops
141.675 – 55th FS Air-to-Air
141.900 – 55th FS Air-to-Air
143.600 – 55th FS Air-to-Air

320.525 – 79th FS Ops
138.150 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
141.150 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
141.700 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
143.200 – 79th FS Air-to-Air

298.500 – Heard in use by another listener between 192nd FW/95th FS flights

BASH (F-22A, 192nd FW)
CORONA (F-22A, 192nd FW)
DEMON (F-22A, 192nd FW)
PANAMA (F-22A, 192nd FW)
RECAP (F-22A, 192nd FW)
SATAN (F-22A, 192nd FW)
SLAM (F-22A, 192nd FW)

IRON (T-38, 71st FTS)
MARLIN (T-38, 71st FTS)
MIG (T-38, 71st FTS)
VODKA (T-38, 71st FTS)
VOODOO (T-38, 71st FTS)

FANG (F-15C, 125th FW)
GATOR (F-15C, 125th FW)
JAGS (F-15C, 125th FW)

CONAN (F-16CM, 55th FS)
DUDE (F-16CM, 55th FS
SPIDER (F-16CM, 55th FS)
VOODOO (F-16CM, 55th FS)

DECAY (F-16CM, 79th FS)
DIESEL (F-16CM, 79th FS)
HELLCAT (F-16CM, 79th FS)
SCAR (F-16CM, 79th FS)
SLASH (F-16CM, 79th FS)
TURBAN (F-16CM, 79th FS)
WILD (F-16CM, 79th FS)

BONES (F-22A, 95th FS)
HEARSE (F-22A, 95th FS)

KEYS 83 (KC-135R, 58-0120, 186th ARW)
EXPO 81 (KC-135T, 58-0086, 141st ARW)
WYLIE 61 (KC-135R, 57-1427, 190th AW)
WYLIE 61 (KC-135R, 62-3572, 190th AW)

DOGHOUSE (325th FW Schoolhouse)
SENTRY 06/GOLIATH (E-3G, 78-0576, 960th ACCS)
HUNTRESS (NORAD EADS)
DRAGON (RTO)

BOXER 42 (C-40C, 02-0201, 113th Wing)

Sentry Savannah Update; 16 May 2018

SavannahYesterday, I posted about a Sentry Savannah exercise being underway out of the Savannah Air Dominance Center. Yesterday’s activity, despite being cut short by bad weather during the afternoon sortie, was far bigger than Tuesday’s activity and included participation by F-16s from the 55th and 79th Fighter Squadrons from Shaw AFB as well as F-22s from the 95th FS from Tyndall AFB. A 186th ARW KC-135 from Meridian, Mississippi also participated as tanker support for the afternoon sorties. As a result, the callsign/frequency list is greatly expanded. The callsign MARLIN has also been confirmed as 71st FTS T-38s by a Langley area listener and another listener contributed 298.500 as an air-to-air frequency in use; as always, if you have additions or corrections, please let me know in the comments below.

119.100/257.800 – Savannah IAP Tower
124.975/279.575 – Hunter AAF Tower
126.200/285.425 – Hunter AAF Base Ops
120.400/353.775 – Savannah Approach/Departure
125.300/371.875 – Savannah Approach/Departure
118.400/307.225 – Savannah Approach/Departure

256.875/135.450 – Jax Center Keystone Ultra High
277.400/126.750 – Jax Center Brunswick Low
281.550 – Jax Center Georgetown High
282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
285.650/126.125 – Jax Center Statesboro High
290.350/132.425 – Jax Center Hunter Ultra High
306.300/133.450 – Jax Center Florence Low
317.550/134.375 – Jax Center Charleston Low
319.200/127.875 – Jax Center Aiken High
346.300/133.300 – Jax Center Moultrie Ultra High
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Allendale/Savannah Low

120.950/284.500 – SEALORD North Primary
313.700 – SEALORD North Secondary
133.950/267.500 – SEALORD South Primary

288.400 – NORAD Discrete; Check-In
293.600 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
254.200 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling
274.400 – Aerial Refueling
278.000 – Aerial Refueling

228.400 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA

237.000 – ADC Ops; 192nd FW “RAPTOR Ops,” 71st FTS “IRON Ops”
139.2125 ($293) – ADC; 192nd FW/71st FTS Support Crews
233.525 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
257.075 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
262.025 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
296.900 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
235.900 – 71st FTS Air-to-Air
320.600 – 71st FTS Air-to-Air, Fight Common

251.250 – 125th FW Ops
234.800 – 125th FW Aux 5
253.700 – 125th FW Aux 6
314.200 – 125th FW Aux 7

311.200 – 55th FS Ops
141.675 – 55th FS Air-to-Air
141.900 – 55th FS Air-to-Air
143.600 – 55th FS Air-to-Air

320.525 – 79th FS Ops
141.150 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
141.700 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
143.200 – 79th FS Air-to-Air

298.500 – Heard in use by another listener between 192nd FW/95th FS flights

BASH (F-22A, 192nd FW)
DEMON (F-22A, 192nd FW)
RECAP (F-22A, 192nd FW)
SATAN (F-22A, 192nd FW)

MARLIN (T-38, 71st FTS)
MIG (T-38, 71st FTS)
VODKA (T-38, 71st FTS)
VOODOO (T-38, 71st FTS)

FANG (F-15C, 125th FW)
GATOR (F-15C, 125th FW)

CONAN (F-16CM, 55th FS)
DUDE (F-16CM, 55th FS
SPIDER (F-16CM, 55th FS)
VOODOO (F-16CM, 55th FS)

DIESEL (F-16CM, 79th FS)
SLASH (F-16CM, 79th FS)
TURBAN (F-16CM, 79th FS)
WILD (F-16CM, 79th FS)

BONES (F-22A, 95th FS)
HEARSE (F-22A, 95th FS)

EXPO 81 (KC-135T, 58-0086, 141st ARW)
WYLIE 61 (KC-135R, 62-3572, 190th AW)

DOGHOUSE (325th FW Schoolhouse)
HUNTRESS (NORAD EADS)
DRAGON (RTO)

The F-16s from Shaw AFB and F-22s from Tyndall AFB operated from their own fields and did not use the facilities at Savannah IAP. The 186th ARW KC-135 also operated out of its home field and didn’t use Hunter AAF.

Book Review: Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway: The Japanese Story of the Battle of Midway by Jonathan Parshall and Anthony Tully

18663139A few years ago, I read Craig L. Symond’s The Battle of Midway (Pivotal Moments in American History) and saw Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway: The Japanese Story of the Battle of Midway by Jonathan Parshall and Anthony Tully referenced in it. I took a look at the book on Amazon and it had a plain simple cover, giving it the feeling of an academic work, so I added it to my reading list but didn’t put it very high on the list. Recently, I finally got around to reading it.

Shattered Sword presents a new way of looking at the Battle of Midway. It is well researched and well documented with extensive endnotes and a lengthy bibliography. It is detailed yet captivating. Most of all, it presents strong arguments, backs up those arguments with documented sources, and effectively turns the traditional narrative of the Battle of Midway on its ear. The authors explore doctrine, strategy, planning, and tactics from the Japanese perspective; in doing so, they don’t just challenge the conventional wisdom about the battle and its after effects; to borrow from the title, it shatters them.

To put it mildly, this book is not what I thought it was. It is not a dry academic work, it is well written in a witty, conversational style. You’re not only getting a completely new understanding of the battle, you’re being entertained. It truly is hard to put this book down. Very seldom do you come across a book that presents an all-new way of looking at a historical event, but this book fits that bill. I’ve purposely not included any of Shattered Swords’ conclusions in order not to spoil the book. Buy it read it, you won’t be disappointed and you’ll come away with a whole new understanding of one of World War II’s important battles. I also think that those interested in military history can come away with important lessons, one of them being not to apply one side’s doctrine and operational practices to its opponent, analyze both sides’ actions in the light of their respective doctrines. It’s helpful to have about the Battle of Midway previously and have an understanding of how the US Navy fought the battle, but this truly is a five-star book and one that anyone interested in the Pacific Theater of World War II must read.

Another Sentry Savannah Exercise Underway at the Savannah Air Dominance Center

Savannah – Last week, F-22As from the 192nd Fighter Wing, Virginia Air National Guard and T-38s from the 71st Fighter Training Squadron, both from Langley AFB, arrived at the Savannah Air Dominance Center at the Savannah – Hilton Head International Airport. Given the timing of their arrival, I’m not sure if they are considering this week 1 of the exercise or week 2, so they may depart late this week or remain for next week as well. I wasn’t able to hear very much of the activity last week, but this week I’ve heard participating aircraft checking in “for the Sentry Savannah airspace,” so it’s definitely a Sentry Savannah exercise. The other participants so far have been F-15Cs from the 125th, Florida Air National Guard at Jacksonville, and two KC-135s; one from the 141st Air Refueling Wing, Washington Air National Guard at Fairchild AFB and one from the 190th Air Refueling Wing, Kansas Air National Guard at Forbes ANGB. For those familiar with previous iterations of Sentry Savannah, they’re using frequencies which have been fairly regular through the last few years.

Frequencies

119.100/257.800 – Savannah IAP Tower
124.975/279.575 – Hunter AAF Tower
126.200/285.425 – Hunter AAF Base Ops
120.400/353.775 – Savannah Approach/Departure
125.300/371.875 – Savannah Approach/Departure
118.400/307.225 – Savannah Approach/Departure

282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Allendale/Savannah Low

120.950/284.500 – Sealord North Primary
133.950/267.500 – Sealord South Primary

288.400 – NORAD Discrete; Check-In
293.600 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
274.400 – Aerial Refueling
278.000 – Aerial Refueling

237.000 – ADC Ops; 192nd FW “RAPTOR Ops,” 71st FTS “IRON Ops”
233.525 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
257.075 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
262.025 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
296.900 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
235.900 – 71st FTS Air-to-Air
320.600 – 71st FTS Air-to-Air, Fight Common

251.250 – 125th FW Ops
234.800 – 125th FW Aux 5
253.700 – 125th FW Aux 6
314.200 – 125th FW Aux 7

 

Callsigns

BASH (F-22A, 192nd FW)
DEMON (F-22A, 192nd FW)
RECAP (F-22A, 192nd FW)
SATAN (F-22A, 192nd FW)

MIG (T-38, 71st FTS)
VODKA (T-38, 71st FTS)
VOODOO (T-38, 71st FTS)

MARLIN (F-22A or T-38)

FANG (F-15C, 125th FW)
GATOR (F-15C, 125th FW)

EXPO 81 (KC-135T, 58-0086, 141st ARW)
WYLIE 61 (KC-135R, 62-3572, 190th AW)

DOGHOUSE (325th FW Schoolhouse)
HUNTRESS (NORAD EADS)

B.B. King May Be Gone, But His Music Lives On

B.B. King was born at a Mississippi cotton plantation, but when he passed away three years ago today, he was the King of the Blues. He could make his guitar, Lucille, sing with the sweetest, warmest, most soulful voice. You could identify him with the first note he played, his sound was that distinctive. His voice was just as powerful an instrument: strong and from the very depths of his soul. It didn’t matter whether he was singing or Lucille was, every note overflowed with emotion and feeling.

“There’s a sadness to all kinds of music if you want to hear it. There’s also happiness to it if you want to hear it.” -BB King

“…There’s always happiness to it if you want to hear it.” That, I think, is B.B. King’s music in a nutshell. Yes, it was the Blues. Yes, he sang about hard times and troubles, about trouble in life and love, but so often he played and sang with positive, uplifting feeling. He tugged at your heartstrings, but he also made you feel better, and at the end of the day, isn’t that what the blues is supposed to do? He’s without a doubt my favorite bluesman.

If you’re not a fan of B.B. King and want to hear what I’m talking about, I’ll suggest four albums; three are live albums and one is a studio album. To me, live is where B.B. King was at his best and these three albums, to me, are his best at different stages of his career: Live at the Regal (1965), Live in Japan (1971), and Live at the BBC (late 70s/early 80s, early 90s/late 90s). Live in Japan also shows his instrumental side. My favorite studio album is Indianola Mississippi Seeds (1970), which has two of my favorite B.B. King songs: “Hummingbird,” with its soaring, uplifting, gospel-like ending and “Chains and Things,” a deep, haunting, dirge of a blues song.