Coastal Georgia Military Monitoring Recap; July 2018

I didn’t have as much radio time during July as I would have liked, but none the less, it was certainly an interesting month. The big event of the month was a Sentry Savannah exercise out of the Georgia Air National Guard’s Air Dominance Center at the Savannah-Hilton Head International Airport. Later in the month, some AH-1Ws and UH-1Ys from HMLA-269 worked out of Savannah-Hilton Head IAP flying missions to Townsend Range.  July also saw another detachment of VMFT-401 F-5Ns at MCAS Beaufort as part of the F-35B training program. Some other interesting activity was E-2Cs from VAW-120 doing practice approaches in Savannah, urban Close Air Support training involving F-16s from Shaw AFB over Brunswick, GA, and F-15Es from Seymour-Johnson AFB working at Townsend Range. While not military, I caught a Boeing 747 Large Cargo Freighter (LCF) over the radio for the first time early one morning as one departed Boeing’s facility at Charleston for Anchorage, Alaska.

This month, I’ve also included some photos contributed by Paul Snedeker, KJ4FAV along with the callsign and frequency listings.

Hunter AAF
124.975 – Tower
279.575 – Tower
121.800 – Ground
291.675 – Ground
126.200 – Base Ops
285.425 – Base Ops
309.000 – PMSV
38.1500 – 1/169 AVN “HURRICANE Ops”
345.000 – USCG AirSta Savannah Ops

ARMY 03748 (MH-47G, 04-03748, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03761 (MH-47G, 05-03761, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20018 (MH-60M, 05-20018, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20209 (MH-60M, 09-20209, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20211 (MH-60M, 09-20211, 3-160 SOAR)
SHADY 12 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 13 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 29 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 58 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 60 (MC-12S, 11-00265, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 83 (MC-12S, 11-00265, 224th MI Bn)
COAST GUARD 6526 (MH-65D, 6526, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6531 (MH-65D, 6531, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6544 (MH-65D, 6544, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6547 (MH-65D, 6547, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6567 (MH-65D, 6567, CGAS Savannah)
ARMY 20431 (UH-60M?, ??-20431, US Army)
COPPER 03 (KC-135R, 64-14831, 161st ARW)
DIXIE 70 (KC-135R, 57-1453, 117th ARW)
GUARD 23891 (UH-60A, 83-23891, ARNG)
GUARD 20300 (HH-60M, 10-20300, 1-111 AVN GA ARNG)
N247CF (B300, Raytheon Aircraft Company)

 

IMG_1175
COPPER 03 (KC-135R, 64-14831, 161st ARW) on approach to Hunter AAF after supporting Sentry Savannah activity off of the Georgia coast on 25 July 2018. Photo courtesy of Paul Snedeker, KJ4FAV

 

Savannah IAP/CRTC
119.100 – Tower
257.800 – Tower
121.900 – Ground
348.600 – Ground
120.400 – Approach/Departure
353.775 – Approach/Departure
125.300 – Approach/Departure
371.875 – Approach/Departure
118.400 – Approach/Departure
307.225 – Approach/Departure
123.025 – Savannah Helicopter Advisory
225.750 – 165th AW CP “ANIMAL CONTROL”
237.000 – Air Dominance Center (ADC) Ops
173.5625 – 165th AW MOC (NAC 302)
123.350 – Gulfstream Test Air-to-Air
130.375 – Signature Flight Support
255.675 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
256.750 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
288.900 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
320.600 – 2nd FTS Air-to-Air

DAWG 08 (C-130H3, 94-6708, 165th AW)
EAGLE ## (MD-500, Chatham Co)
GULFTEST 10 (G600, N730GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 14 (G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 20 (G500, N511GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 25 (G500, N503G, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 27 (G600, N730GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 33 (G650, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 33 (G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 41 (G600, N720GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 48 (G650, N643GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 50 (G550, N577GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 58 (G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 62 (G450, N60TC, Tristram Colket Jr)
GULFTEST 69 (G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 83 (G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
RAPTOR ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)
SAVAGE ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)
STINGER ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)
VAPOR ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)
BEAGLE ## (T-38, 2nd FTS)
HOUND ## (T-38, 2nd FTS)
GUNRUNNER 1# (AH-1W/UH-1, HMLA-269)

Sentry Savannah
288.400 – NORAD Discrete; Check-In
293.600 – NORAD Discrete; intercepts
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; intercepts
349.800 – W-137 Discrete; intercepts
376.900 – W-137 Discrete; intercepts
265.400 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling
278.000 – Aerial Refueling

Fort Stewart/Wright AAF
127.350 – Marne Radio
279.625 – Marne Radio
126.250 – Wright AAF Tower
269.275 – Wright AAF Tower

Brunswick/Golden Isles Airport
123.000 – CTAF

Malcolm McKinnon Airport/Jekyll Island Airport
123.050 – CTAF

Plantation Air Park, Sylvania, GA
122.800 – CTAF

Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport
122.800 – CTAF

JUMPER # (C182, The Jumping Place)

Hilton Head Airport
118.975 – Tower

MCAS Beaufort
119.050 – Tower
342.875 – Tower
269.125 – Approach/Departure
123.700 – Approach/Departure
292.125 – Approach/Departure
125.125 – Approach/Departure
281.800 – Base Ops
264.500 – PMSV
305.800 – VMFA(AW)-224 Base
228.300 – VMFA(AW)-224 Tac 1
258.900 – VMFA(AW)-224 Tac 2
313.800 – VMFA-251 Base
251.400 – VMFA-251 Tac 1
299.275 – VMFA-312 Tac 1
343.200 – VMFAT-501 Base
326.700 – VMFAT-501 Tac 1
349.225 – VMFAT-501 Tac 2
341.825 – VMFAT-501 Tac 3
299.300 – VMFA(AW)-533 Tac 2; VMFT-401 Air-to-Air

BENGAL 4# (F/A-18D, VMFA(AW)-224)
TBOLT 5# (F/A-18A+, VMFA-251)
SWEDE ## (F-35B, VMFAT-501)
SNIPER (F-5N, VMFT-401)

Jacksonville IAP
118.000 – Approach/Departure
121.300 – Approach/Departure
123.800 – Approach/Departure
124.900 – Approach/Departure
127.000 – Approach/Departure
322.400 – Approach/Departure
335.600 – Approach/Departure
351.800 – Approach/Departure
377.050 – Approach/Departure
251.250 – 125th FW Maintenance/Ops
273.900 – 125th FW SOF
234.800 – 125th FW Aux 5
253.700 – 125th FW Aux 6
343.000 – 125th FW Aux 8

FANG ## (F-15C, 125th FW)
GATOR ## (F-15C, 125th FW)

NAS Jacksonville/Mayport NS/Cecil Field
118.000 – Approach/Departure
121.300 – Approach/Departure
123.800 – Approach/Departure
124.900 – Approach/Departure
127.000 – Approach/Departure
322.400 – Approach/Departure
335.600 – Approach/Departure
351.800 – Approach/Departure
377.050 – Approach/Departure
310.200 – NAS Jacksonville Base Ops
264.200 – VP-8 Base
306.000 – VP-30 Base
246.900 – P-8A/VP-30 Air-to-Air

MADFOX 09 (P-8A, 169340, VP-5)
MADFOX 10 (P-8A, 169337, VP-5)
MADFOX 21 (P-8A, 169337, VP-5)
MADFOX 29 (P-8A, 169339, VP-5)
MADFOX 29 (P-8A, 169340, VP-5)
MADFOX 45 (P-8A, 169340, VP-5)
TIGER 07 (P-8A, 169336, VP-8)
TIGER 23 (P-8A, 169336, VP-8)
TIGER 24 (P-8A, 169005, VP-8)
TIGER 64 (P-8A, 169336, VP-8)
TIGER 87 (P-8A, 169007, VP-8)
TALON 87 (P-8A, 168855, VP-30)
TRIDENT 01 (P-8A, 169003, VP-26)
TRIDENT 11 (P-8A, 168438, VP-5)
TRIDENT 69 (P-8A, 169324, VP-26)
TRIDENT 90 (P-8A, 169003, VP-5)
NAVY LL 03 (P-3C, 162318, VP-30)
NAVY LL 806 (P-8A, 169330, VP-30)
NAVY LL 808 (P-8A, 169330, VP-30)
NAVY LL 811 (P-8A, 169326, VP-30)
NAVY LL 811 (P-8A, 169330, VP-30)
NAVY LL 811 (P-8A, 169335, VP-30)
NAVY LL 816 (P-8A, 169328, VP-30)
NAVY LL 817 (P-8A, 169330, VP-30)
NAVY LL 832 (P-8A, VP-30)
NAVY LL 850 (P-8A, 168856, VP-30)
NAVY LL 850 (P-8A, 169326, VP-30)
NAVY LL 877 (P-8A, 168852, VP-30)
NAVY LL 877 (P-8A, 168856, VP-30)
NAVY LL 878 (P-8A, 168856, VP-30)
NAVY LL 886 (P-8A, 169334, VP-30)
NAVY LL 889 (P-8A, 168852, VP-30)
NAVY LL 898 (P-8A, 168856, VP-30)
NAVY LT 622 (P-3C, 161415, VP-62)
CONVOY 4504(C-40A, 165832, VR-58)
CONVOY 3922 (C-130T, 165314, VR-62)
PIONEER 10 (P-8A, 169338, VX-1)

 

IMG_1226
VP-8 P-8A 169007 photographed by Paul Snedeker, KJ4FAV.

 

Charleston AFB
120.700 – Charleston App/Dep
135.800 – Charleston App/Dep
306.925 – Charleston App/Dep
379.925 – Charleston App/Dep
134.100 – Charleston AFB “PALMETTO Ops”
349.400 – Charleston AFB “PALMETTO Ops”
123.325 – Boeing Charleston

MOOSE 11 (C-17A, 10-0215, 437th/315th AW)
BOEING 164 (B787, Boeing Test)
BOEING 720 (B789, N836AA, American Airlines/Boeing Test)
BOEING 914 (B787, Boeing Test)
GIANT 4316 (B747 LCF, N747BC, Atlas Air)

Shaw AFB
125.400 – Columbia App/Dep
318.100 – Columbia App/Dep
311.200 – 55th FS “SHOOTER Ops”
141.900 – 55th FS Air-to-Air

DUDE ## (F-16CM, 55th FS)
MUSTANG ## (F-16CM, 55th FS)
MISTY ## (F-16CM, 55th FS)
PISTOL ## (F-16CM, 55th FS)

McEntire ANGB
125.400 – Columbia App/Dep
318.100 – Columbia App/Dep
298.300 – 169th FW “SWAMP FOX Ops”
141.825 – 169th FW V14
140.125 – 169th FW V15

MACE ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)
VIPER ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)

Moody AFB
138.150 – 23rd FG Air-to-Air
143.000 – 23rd FG Air-to-Air
143.600 – 23rd FG Air-to-Air

DIABLO 0# (A-10C, 23rd FG)
TABOR ## (A-10C, 23rd FG)

Robins AFB
225.925 – ALC Ops
293.525 – 116th/461st ACW “PEACHTREE Ops”
225.725 – JSTARS Discrete
324.650 – JSTARS Discrete
328.025 – JSTARS Discrete
346.675 – JSTARS Discrete
367.275 – JSTARS Discrete
372.150 – JSTARS Discrete
376.125 – JSTARS Discrete

CANOE 04 (E-8C, 01-2005, 116th/461st ACW)
KOMODO 04 (E-8C, 94-0284, 116th/461st ACW)
PEACH 99 (E-8C, 01-2005, 116th/461st ACW)
STARGATE (E-8C backend, 330th CTS)
BOEING 22 (C-17A, 10-0222, 437th/315th AW)

 

IMG_1139
KOMODO 04 (E-8C, 94-0284, 116th/461st ACW) in the pattern at Hunter AAF on 24 July 2018. Photo by Paul Snedeker, KJ4FAV.

 

Ranges/Military Operating Areas
119.225 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA
228.400 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA
252.900 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA
226.975 – Coastal MOA
343.750 – Bulldog MOA

SEALORD (USN FACSFAC Jax)
120.950 – North Primary
133.950 – South Primary
284.500 – North Primary
267.500 – South Primary
313.700 – North Secondary
349.800 – W-137 Discrete
376.900 – W-137 Discrete

Doubleshot (W-161/177)
127.725 – DOUBLESHOT Primary
228.275 – DOUBLESHOT Primary
258.400 – W-161/177 Discrete
279.725 – W-161/177 Discrete

Miscellaneous
293.600 – NORAD Discrete
316.300 – NORAD Discrete
305.925 – 4th FW Air-to-Air
327.375 – 4th FW Air-to-Air
283.700 – 187th FW Air-to-Air
227.450 – VFA-106 Air-to-Air
248.750 – VFA-106 Air-to-Air
333.300 – VFA-106 Air-to-Air

BAMA 2# (F-16C, 187th FW)
CANFORCE 2582 (CC-130J, 130614, 436 Sqn RCAF)
CARSON 11-14 (F-15E, 4th FW)
COAST GUARD 101 (C-37A, 01, CGAS Washington)
COAST GUARD 2004 (HC-130J, 2004, CGAS Elizabeth City)
CONVOY 4872 (C-40A, 165836, VR-57)
FLASH 29 (C-37A, 01-0029, 6th AMW)
GREYHAWK 03 (E-2C, 169064, VAW-120)
GREYHAWK 04 (E-2C, 169065, VAW-120)
GUARD 26609 (UH-60L, 95-26609, 1-224 AVN FL ARNG)
GUARD 26972 (UH-60L, 02-26971, ARNG)
KEYS 81 (KC-135R, 63-7992, 186th ARW)
LUCKY 41 (KC-135R, 57-1437, 916th ARW)
MARINE 714 (UC-35D, 166714, VMR-1)
NAVY 101 (C-37B, 166376, VR-1)
NAVY AJ 706 (MH-60R, 166552, HSM-70)
OPEC 70 (KC-10A, 87-0118, 305th AMW)
PAT 082 (C-12V, 10-00256, 2-228 AVN)
PAT 215 (C-26B, 94-00259, DC ARNG)
PRIDE 5# (F/A-18C, VFA-15)
REACH A612 (C-130J, 08-5712, 317th AG)
REACH A612 (C-130J, 11-5752, 19th AW)
SALTY 21-24 (F-15E, 333rd FS)
SAM 787 (C-40B, 01-0040, 89th AW)
SHARK 37 (C-130J, 13-5784, 19th AW)
SOONER 82 (MC-12W, 09-0656, 185th SOS)
TEAM 12 (KC-10A, 87-0121, 305th AMW)
TEAM 13 (KC-10A, 84-0188, 305th AMW)
YANKEE 45 (C-130H, 74-1664, 103rd AW)
N476LC (C550, N476LC, L-3 IS Llc)
LIFESTAR 1 (Bell 407, N407LS, Air Methods)
N269AE (Bell 206L-3, AirEvac 91 Vidalia)

 

IMG_1125_resize
GREYHAWK 03 (E-2D, 169064, VAW-120) during approach work at Hunter AAF on 18 July 2018. Photo by Paul Snedeker, KJ4FAV.
IMG_1120
GREYHAWK 04 (E-2D, 169065, VAW-120) during approach work at Hunter AAF on 18 July 2018. Photo by Paul Snedeker, KJ4FAV.

 

ARTCC
323.300/133.700 – Jax Center Baxley Low
254.325/125.375 – Jax Center Taylor Low
269.250/133.325 – Jax Center Ocala Low
269.550/124.700 – Jax Center Columbia Low
277.400/126.750 – Jax Center Brunswick Low
281.550 – Jax Center Georgetown High
282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
282.300/135.975 – Jax Center Alma High
285.650/126.125 – Jax Center Statesboro High
290.350/132.425 – Jax Center Hunter Ultra High
290.400/132.300 – Jax Center Waycross Low
307.250/126.350 – Jax Center St. Augustine High
317.600/135.750 – Jax Center Cedar Key Low
319.200/127.875 – Jax Center Aiken High
351.700/124.075 – Jax Center Summerville High
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Millen Low
379.100/127.950 – Jax Center Charleston Low
135.050 – Jax Center Meta Low/High

269.175/129.925 – Atlanta Center Burne High
273.600/123.950 – Atlanta Center Macon Low
290.375/125.825 – Atlanta Center Macon Ultra High
307.050/126.425 – Atlanta Center Dublin High
322.325/128.100 – Atlanta Center Augusta Low
353.925/125/375 – Atlanta Center Lanier High
360.750/134.500 – Atlanta South Departure Low

255.400/123.650 – FSS

USCG
156.8000 – Marine VHF Ch. 16
157.0500 – Marine VHF Ch. 21; Sector Charleston/Station Tybee
157.1000 – Marine VHF Ch. 22
162.3250 – USCG Net 111 (NAC 293); Sector Jacksonville
163.1375 – USCG Net 113 (NAC 293); Station Tybee
164.9000 – USCG Net 118 (NAC 293); Station Brunswick
412.9750 – USCG Net 409 (NAC 293); Sector Jacksonville
413.0000 – USCG Net 410 (NAC 293); Sector Charleston

Coastal Georgia Mode-S Log; July 2018

Mode-S hits from Military, Government, and Public Safety related aircraft as well as various other aircraft that catch my attention from attended monitoring of my RadarBox in Savannah and RadarBox Micro in Brunswick, GA.

 

TIGER 87
TIGER 87 (P-8A, 169007, VP-8) in the pattern at Hunter AAF on 6 July 2018
TALON 87
TALON 87 (P-8A, 168855, VP-16) holding northwest of Savannah on 9 July 2018)
CFC2582
CANFORCE 2582 (CC-130J, 130614, 436 Sqn RCAF) transiting along the Georgia and South Carolina coasts on 24 July 2018
OPEC70
OPEC 70 (KC-10A, 87-0118, 305th AMW) transiting along the Georgia and South Carolina coasts on 25 July 2018

 

7813F9 – B787, ?????, Boeing Test (BOE914)
83AEFC – C-12U, 84-24378, C/2-228 AVN (PAT028)
A24A38 – B300, N247CF, Raytheon Aircraft Company
A2A071 – Bell 206L-3, N269AE, AirEvac 91 Vidalia (N269AE)
A45199 – B767, N378AX, Omni Air Intl (OAE561)
A4C7AD – Bell 407, N407LS, Air Methods (LIFESTAR 1 on ATC)
A5D861 – C550, N476LC, L-3 IS Llc (N476LC)
A645AB – G500, N503G, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF25)
A64973 – G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF69)
A665C0 – G500, N511GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF20)
A76901 – G550, N577GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF50)
A7C692 – G450, N60TC, Tristram Colket Jr (GLF62)
A7CB8D – G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF83)
A870F7 – G650, N643GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GL48)
A9A426 – G600, N720GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF41)
A9CBA5 – G600, N730GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF10)
A9CBA5 – G600, N730GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF27)
A9F324 – G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF14)
A9F324 – G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF33)
A9F324 – G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF58)
AB6EA5 – B789, N836AA, American Airlines/Boeing Test (BOE72)
ADFD86 – C-26B, 94-00259, DC ARNG (PAT215)
ADFDED – C-130H3, 94-6708, 165th AW (DAWG10 on box, DAWG 08 on ATC)
AE0130 – KC-10A, 87-0118, 305th AMW (OPEC70)
AE021B – KC-10A, 84-0188, 305th AMW (TEAM13)
AE0233 – KC-10A, 87-0121, 305th AMW (TEAM12)
AE0326 – C-130H, 74-1664, 103rd AW (YANKEE 45 on ATC)
AE0379 – KC-135R, 63-7992, 186th ARW (KEYS81)
AE03EB – C-130T, 165314, VR-62 (CONVOY 3922 on ATC)
AE0415 – E-6B, 164388, VQ-4
AE04B2 – KC-135R, 57-1453, 117th ARW (DIXIE70)
AE04DA – C-40A, 165832, VR-58 (CNV4504)
AE04DB – KC-135R, 57-1437, 916th ARW (LUCKY41)
AE0559 – C-5M, 83-1285, 436th AW (RCH311)
AE06E4 – UC-12M, 163836, MCAS Beaufort
AE074E – UC-12M, 163840, MCAS Beaufort
AE07C6 – KC-135R, 64-14831, 161st ARW (COPPER3)
AE07C6 – KC-135R, 64-14831, 161st ARW (DIXIE70)
AE087F – C-37A, 01-0029, 6th AMW (FLASH29)
AE0945 – C-40B, 01-0040, 89th AW (SAM787)
AE10C1 – C-37A, 01, CGAS Washington (C101)
AE10EA – HC-130J, 2004, CGAS Elizabeth City (C2004)
AE1258 – C-37B, 166376, VR-1 (VV101)
AE13E6 – C-12C, 78-23128, USASOC Flt Det
AE1439 – UC-35D, 166714, VMR-1 (VM714)
AE148E – E-8C, 94-0284, 116th/461st ACW (KOMODO4)
AE1499 – E-8C, 01-2005, 116th/461st ACW (CANOE04)
AE1499 – E-8C, 01-2005, 116th/461st ACW (PEACH99)
AE15DB – P-3C, 161415, VP-62 (NAVY LT 622 on ATC)
AE1D72 – P-3C, 162318, VP-30 (NAVY LL 03 on ATC)
AE2674 – MH-65D, 6526, CGAS Savannah
AE2679 – MH-65D, 6531, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6531)
AE2686 – MH-65D, 6547, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6547)
AE2699 – MH-65D, 6567, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6567)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY12)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY13)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY29)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY58)
AE2F69 – MC-12W, 09-0656, 185th SOS (SOONER 82 on ATC)
AE4D68 – C-17A, 10-0215, 437th/315th AW (MOOSE11)
AE4E08 – C-130J, 08-5712, 317th AG (RCHA612)
AE4E12 – C-130J, 11-5752, 19th AW (RCHA612)
AE4EBC – P-8A, 168438, VP-5 (00000000 on box, TRIDENT 11 on ATC)
AE509F – MH-65D, 6544, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6544)
AE5384 – UH-60M?, ??-20431, US Army (20431)
AE5772 – C-12V, 10-00256, 2-228 AVN (PAT 082 on ATC)
AE57B8 – P-8A, 168852, VP-30 (VVLL877)
AE57B8 – P-8A, 168852, VP-30 (VVLL889)
AE57BB – P-8A, 168855, VP-16 (00000000 on box, TALON 87 on ATC)
AE57BC – P-8A, 168856, VP-30 (00000000 on box, NAVY LL 878 on ATC)
AE57BC – P-8A, 168856, VP-30 (00000000)
AE57BC – P-8A, 168856, VP-30 (VVLL850)
AE57BC – P-8A, 168856, VP-30 (VVLL877)
AE57BC – P-8A, 168856, VP-30 (VVLL898)
AE57C8 – P-8A, 169003, VP-26 (TRIDENT 01 on ATC)
AE57C8 – P-8A, 169003, VP-5 (00000000)
AE57C8 – P-8A, 169003, VP-5 (TRIDENT 90 on ATC)
AE57CA – P-8A, 169005, VP-8 (TIGER24)
AE57CC – P-8A, 169007, VP-8 (TIGER87)
AE58B4 – MC-12S, 11-00265, 224th MI Bn
AE58B4 – MC-12S, 11-00265, 224th MI Bn (SHADY 60 on ATC)
AE58B4 – MC-12S, 11-00265, 224th MI Bn (SHADY 83 on ATC)
AE595B – C-130J, 13-5784, 19th AW (SHARK37)
AE5C56 – P-8A, 169324, VP-26 (00000000 on box, TRIDENT 69 on ATC)
AE5C58 – P-8A, 169326, VP-30 (VVLL811)
AE5C58 – P-8A, 169326, VP-30 (VVLL850)
AE5C5A – P-8A, 169328, VP-30 (VVLL816)
AE5C5C – P-8A, 169330, VP-30 (VVLL806)
AE5C5C – P-8A, 169330, VP-30 (VVLL808)
AE5C5C – P-8A, 169330, VP-30 (VVLL811)
AE5C5C – P-8A, 169330, VP-30 (VVLL817)
AE5C60 – P-8A, 169334, VP-30 (LL886)
AE5C61 – P-8A, 169335, VP-30 (VVLL811)
AE5C62 – P-8A, 169336, VP-8 (TIGER23)
AE5C62 – P-8A, 169336, VP-8 (TIGER24)
AE5C62 – P-8A, 169336, VP-8 (TIGER64)
AE5C62 – P-8A, 169336, VP-8 (TIGER7)
AE5C63 – P-8A, 169337, VP-5 (MADFX10)
AE5C63 – P-8A, 169337, VP-5 (MADFX21)
AE5C64 – P-8A, 169338, VX-1 (0000000 on box, PIONEER 10 on ATC)
AE5C65 – P-8A, 169339, VP-5 (MADFX29)
AE5C66 – P-8A, 169340, VP-5 (00000000 on box, MADFOX 45 on ATC)
AE5C66 – P-8A, 169340, VP-5 (MADFOX9)
AE5C66 – P-8A, 169340, VP-5 (MADFX29)
AE5C67 – P-8A, 169341, VP-30 (00000000)
C2B5AD – CC-130J, 130614, 436 Sqn RCAF (CFC2582)

History Related Amateur Radio Special Events Stations for August 2018

Each month, there are always some History related Amateur Radio Special Event Stations; I picked three to write about for August 2018. To be more accurate, two of them are organizations which are being commemorated by multiple stations: the US Coast Guard’s (USCG) Anniversary and the Citizens Conservation Corps (CCC). Many are familiar with the USCG and its lifesaving role on the coasts and waterways of the nation (among other roles), but I imagine more than a few aren’t familiar with the CCC; it was a program that helped put people to work during the Great Depression and is just as deserving of recognition as one of our military services is. The third event that is being commemorated by a special event station this month is the flight of a US Navy blimp to the Arctic. It was part of a dual mission utilizing the latest technology of the era and some of the oldest aviation technology.

On the weekend of 4/5 August, a number of amateur radio stations and groups will be operating special event stations in honor of the US Coast Guard’s 228th Anniversary. On 4 August 1790, Congress authorized the Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton to form the United States Revenue Cutter Service, charged with enforcing customs laws. Since there was no United States Navy at the time (it wasn’t re-established until 1798), the Cutter Service also took on additional duties (some of which they still carry out today) as coastal defense, rescue, government transport, and mail transport. In 1915, the Cutter Revenue Service was merged with the United States Lifesaving Service to create the United States Coast Guard. In 1939, the Coast Guard took on additional duties when United States Lighthouse Service was brought under its control. In 1942, the Coast Guard picked up more responsibilities when the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation was put under their control. As a result of these mergers and transfers, the Coast Guard became a multi-role agency with search and rescue, regulatory, and law enforcement duties. Because it can be transferred to military control during wartime, the Coast Guard is also considered one of the nation’s armed forces. During both World War I and World War II, it was transferred to the control of Navy Department and transferred back to the Treasury Department after the wars. After the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001, the Coast Guard was transferred from the Treasury Department to the Department of Homeland Security. The Coast Guard has a significant presence in coastal Georgia, with stations in Savannah and Brunswick, at the port facilities in Savannah and Brunswick, and with Coast Guard Air Station Savannah at Hunter AAF in Savannah.

Citizens Conservation Corps on the Air (CCC on the Air) is 11/12 August (it takes place each year on the second full weekend of August). Amateur radio operators and groups across the country will be setting up and operating from the sites CCC camps and public works projects built by the CCC to honor the work of the Corps and the men it employed. The CCC was was one of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal work relief programs. Between the years of 1933 and 1942, the CCC employed men between the ages of 17 and 28 as unskilled manual laborers to conserve and improve local, state, and federal government owned lands. It served two purposes; it put many unemployed men back to work and improved government lands for the public. One of the most popular of the New Deal programs to relieve unemployment caused by the Great Depression, it also had a lasting impact on the country. Many of the state and federal parks and historic sites we have today are here because of the work the CCC did in reforestation, building programs, and infrastructure improvements. In coastal Georgia, CCC projects included (among many others) Fort Stewart, Fort Pulaski, McKinnon St. Simons Island Airport, the St. Simons Island Coast Guard Station, and the Okefenokee NWR. Look for participating stations on or around 3.550 CW and 3.950 LSB, 7.050 CW and 7.250 LSB, 14.050 CW and 14.250 USB, 21.050 CW and 21.250 USB, and 28.050 CW and 28.350 USB.

On 18 August 2018, the Shea Naval Aviation Museum Amateur Radio Club, W1NAS in South Weymouth, MA will be commemorating the 60th anniversary of the flight of the US Navy blimp Snow Goose from Naval Air Station South Weymouth to Resolute Bay on the Arctic Circle. Prior to finding the listing for this special event station, I didn’t know anything about this flight; while researching it online, I didn’t find much and what I did find seems to conflict with some of the information in the listing on the ARRL’s website (see next paragraph). In late July and August 1958, the ZPG-2 Airship Snow Goose and its crew made the flight for the purpose of evaluating lighter-than-air craft for supporting Arctic science and military missions. The flight took Snow Goose and crew from South Weymouth to Akron, OH to Fort Churchill in Manitoba, Canada to Resolute Bay where they then flew to Ice Island T-3. It was the first airship to fly into the Arctic Circle since it was done by the Graf Zeppelin in July 1931. The flight was 4,700 miles long and the airship never went above 2,100 ft. above sea level. Snow Goose‘s mission was successful, but ultimately it was for naught because the Navy ended that era of airship operations in 1961. W1NAS will be operating on or near 14.250 USB and 7.250 LSB. QSL via Steve Cohn, W1OD, 10 Hemlock Terrace, Randolph, MA 02368.

Both the ARRL listing and one of the sources I found indicate that the Snow Goose‘s mission was concurrent with the USS Nautilus‘s Arctic mission in August 1958. The conflict comes in where the ARRL listing states that the Snow Goose and USS Nautilus maintained communications with each other. Multiple book reviews of Arctic Mission: 90 North by Airship and Submarine by William Althoff, however, state that the two missions were not aware of each other because the Nautilus’ mission was secret whereas the Snow Goose‘s was public (just because the public was told the two missions weren’t’ aware of each, however, doesn’t mean they weren’t – it wouldn’t surprise me if they did maintain communications). The reviews of Arctic Mission also indicate that both missions were a response to the Soviet Union’s Sputnik launch. If you’re interested, the Lighter Than Air Society has a wonderful account of the flight by one of the crew members.  I’m really interested in trying to find out more about this flight, including getting a copy of Althoff’s book if I can find an inexpensive one!

On 25/26 August, KD7ZDO, Clackamas County Amateur Radio Emergency Services in Oregon City, OR will be commemorating the End of the Oregon Trail’s 175th Anniversary.

In addition to these special events, the weekend of 18/19 August is International Lighthouse and Lightship Weekend (ILLW), which along with Museum Ships on the Air Weekend, is one of my favorite amateur radio events of the year. It isn’t unusual for lighthouses and lightships to be landmarks, historic sites, or museums, so ILLW is also a History related event. There is a huge list of participants in this event, so you’re likely to be able to add more than one lighthouse or lightship to you log over the weekend.

Sentry Savannah July 2018 Update

Savannah – I haven’t had a lot of monitoring time, but I have been able to listen to a few more morning sorties and other listeners have contributed what they’ve heard, so I’ve got an update for what should be the last couple of days of the current Sentry Savannah exercise. Paul, KJ4FAV also provided a photo of COPPER 03 (KC-135R, 64-14831, 161st ARW), the Arizona ANG KC-135 providing tanker support for the exercise.

IMG_1175
COPPER 03 (KC-135R, 64-14831, 161st ARW) on approach to Hunter AAF after supporting Sentry Savannah activity off of the Georgia coast on 25 July 2018. Photo courtesy of Paul Snedeker, KJ4FAV

 

119.100/257.800 – Savannah-Hilton Head IAP Tower
120.400/353.775 – Savannah Approach/Departure
125.300/371.875 – Savannah Approach/Departure
124.975/279.575 – Hunter AAF Tower
126.200/285.425 – Hunter AAF Base Ops

282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
282.300/135.975 – Jax Center Alma High
317.550/134.375 – Jax Center Charleston Low
285.650/126.125 – Jax Center Statesboro High
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Allendale/Savannah Low

237.000 – ADC Ops; 43rd FS “HORNET/STINGER Ops”
255.675 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
256.750 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
288.900 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
320.600 – 2nd FTS Air-to-Air

298.300 – 169th FW “SWAMP FOX Ops”
141.825 – 169th FW Air-to-Air

277.450 – 187th FW Air-to-Air
283.700 – 187th FW Air-to-Air

120.950/284.500 – Sealord North Primary
313.700 – Sealord North Secondary
288.400 – NORAD Discrete; Check-In
349.800 – W-137 Discrete; Intercepts
376.900 – W-137 Discrete; Intercepts
293.600 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
265.400 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling
278.000 – Aerial Refueling
RAPTOR (F-22A, 43rd FS)
SAVAGE (F-22A, 43rd FS)
STINGER (F-22A, 43rd FS)
VAPOR (F-22A, 43rd FS)
BEAGLE (T-38, 2nd FTS)
HOUND (T-38, 2nd FTS)

COPPER (KC-135R, 161st ARW)
DIXIE (KC-135R, 117th ARW)
KEYS (KC-135R, 186th ARW)

BONES (F-22A, 95th FS)

MACE (F-16CM, 169th FW)

BAMA (F-16C, 187th FW)

DOGHOUSE (325th FW Schoolhouse)
HAMMER (GCI or RTO)
KREMLIN (USMC related ground station)

 

Sentry Savannah exercises usually last two weeks, so this should be the last week of this one. The F-22s and T-38s should start returning home on Friday. If I happen to get anything new over the next couple of days, I’ll post a recap, otherwise this will likely be the last post on the July 2018 Sentry Savannah.

Book Review: On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century by Timothy Snyder

 “It is thus a primary American tradition to consider history when our political order seems imperiled. If we worry today that the American experiment is threatened by tyranny, we can follow the example of the Founding Fathers and contemplate the history of other democracies and republics. The good news is that we can draw upon more recent and relevant examples than ancient Greece and Rome. The bad news is that the history of modern democracy is also one of decline and fall.”

On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth CenturyOn Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century by Timothy Snyder

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Among the opening passages in Timothy Snyder’s On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century is “History does not repeat, but it does instruct.” This book does just that, it instructs us on how to evaluate and navigate the political currents that we face in the United States today. Dr. Snyder, a professor of European and Political History, shows how the rise of Candidate and President Trump has similarities with the rise of modern tyrannical leaders. He takes the History of political movements and the falls of democratic governments in the periods after World War I and before World War II, after World War II, and after the end of the Cold War and uses them to show us how to identify and resist the rise of tyranny here at home. Written because of what the author observed happening around him, On Tyranny reminds me of the political pamphlets and treatises written around the American Revolution. Just as those writings were important in bringing the United States its freedom, this book can be important in keeping our freedom. On Tyranny, though short, is engaging and thought-provoking. Whether you believe that the United States could be slipping toward tyranny or not, it would be in your best interest to read it with an open mind, be vigilant of what it warns of, and heed the lessons it presents.

View all my reviews

I would also recommend Dan Snow’s History Hit Podcast episode about On Tyranny with Dr. Snyder, in which he and host Dan Snow discuss the book and current events. An important takeaway is Dr. Snyder’s advice not to panic.