History Related Amateur Radio Special Event Stations for September 2018

The month of September has a number of History related amateur radio special event stations, but four stood out to me. The first is N0HWJ, which is commemorating the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The second is a set of special event stations, K3B, N3B, and W3B, which commemorate the Battle of Brandywine during the American Revolution. The third, K7T, commemorates the final surrender of Geronimo. The last, W0CXX, commemorates the 85th anniversary of the Collins Radio Company, undoubtedly one of the United States’ most important radio equipment companies.

The N0HWJ Lewis and Clark 1804 Expedition special event station will be ending its multi-month run on 15 September. Beginning at Camp Dubois near Wood River IL in May 1804, the Lewis and Clark Expedition, also known as the Corps of Discovery was commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson after the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Lead by Captain Merriwether Lewis and 2nd Lieutenant William Clark, the expedition was tasked with exploring the newly acquired territory and the Pacific Northwest as well as mapping both territories and staking claim to the Pacific Northwest before European countries could. Additionally, they were to do scientific studies of the plant and animal life and establish relations with the native peoples of the territories. The expedition lasted over two years, ending in September 1806 and traveled over 8,000 miles Despite difficult terrain and conditions and contact with both friendly and unfriendly tribes, there was little violence and they lost only one man. Even though it didn’t find the fabled Northwest Passage, they weren’t the first ones to explore the area, and they set the stage for the treatment of Native Americans in the future, the expedition was a success. They greatly contributed to the United States’ knowledge of its new territory and established a claim to the Pacific Northwest. Look for N0HWJ on or around 14.275,  14.250, 3.982, and 3.975. QSL via Don Lallier, N0HWJ, PO Box 303, Orchard, NE 68764.

Special Event Stations K3B, N3B, and W3B, operated by the Christiana Amateur Radio Emergency Service in Chadds Ford, PA will be commemorating the Battle of Brandywine, fought during the American Revolution, from 6 to 16 September. It was both the longest single-day battle (11 hours) of the American Revolution and was fought by the largest number of troops in any battle of the American Revolution (14,000 plus Americans versus 15,000  plus British)Fought around Chadds Ford and Brandywine Creek in Pennsylvania, the Battle of Brandywine was a significant defeat for the American forces led by George Washington. Poor scouting on the American’s part resulted in a lack of knowledge of where the British were and what they were doing, so the British forces under General William Howe were able to flank the Americans. A combination of delaying and rear guard actions and a British lack of cavalry allowed the Americans to escape and fight another day, but the loss at Brandywine led to the fall of Philadelphia, the home of the Continental Congress. K3B, N3B, and W3B will be operating on or near 21.280 14.280 7.180 3.860. QSL via Battle of Brandywine Special Event, P.O. Box 1324, 1620 Baltimore Pike, Chadds Ford, PA 19317

On 15 September, The Oro Valley Amateur Radio Club in Tucson, AZ will commemorate the 132nd Anniversary of Geronimo’s surrender at Skeleton Canyon with special event station K7T. Many assume Geronimo was a Chief of the Apache tribe, but he wasn’t – he as a leader and medicine man, but not a Chief. He was a skilled leader in raids and warfare and frequently led large numbers of Apaches during the fights with both the United States and Mexico. He and the Apaches following him surrendered and moved on to reservations, breaking out on three occasions due to disease, lack of rations, and the desire to return to their traditional lives: 1878, 1881, and 1885. K7T  commemorates the capture of Geronimo after the 1885 breakout. After the 1885 breakout, Geronimo and his followers were pursued by B Troop, 4th Cavalry under Captain Henry Lawton and 1st Lieutenant Charles Gatewood; the Troopers eventually wore down Geronimo’s group in Mexico and returned them to the United States on 4 September 1886, where they surrendered to General George Crook for the final time at Skeleton Canyon near Douglas, AZ. K7T will be operating SSB on 7.200 and 14.250, CW on 7.040 and 14.040, PSK on 7.070 and 14.070, and FT-8 on 7.074 and 14.074. QSL via email to qsl@tucsonhamradio.org.

The Rockwell Collins Amateur Radio Club, W0CXX, will be operating a special event station on 22/23 September in commemoration of the 85th Anniversary of the Collins Radio Company. Founded in 1933 by Arthur Collins, Initially, Collins manufactured Shortwave and AM equipment, but after providing communications equipment for the Byrd South Pole expedition, the company quickly became the preferred radio manufacturer of the US Military before and during World War II. After World War II, Collins expanded its horizons, moving into satellite and space communications and provided for programs such as Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo. Collins also played a key role in amateur radio, perhaps most notably the S-Line receivers, transmitters, and accessories. Considered some of the best equipment available, Collins and then Rockwell Collins continued to manufacture the S-Line from 1958-1978. Bought by Rockwell in 1973, Rockwell Collins continues to manufacture communications equipment, primarily for commercial, government, and defense users. While they still produce mechanical filters that are available to the public, they no longer produce radios for amateur radio or general public use. Look for W0CXX on or around 14.245, 14.045, 7.195, and 7.045. QSL via W0CXX, 1157 Highway 965 NW, Cedar Rapids, IA 52404. 

History Related Amateur Radio Special Events Stations for August 2018

Each month, there are always some History related Amateur Radio Special Event Stations; I picked three to write about for August 2018. To be more accurate, two of them are organizations which are being commemorated by multiple stations: the US Coast Guard’s (USCG) Anniversary and the Citizens Conservation Corps (CCC). Many are familiar with the USCG and its lifesaving role on the coasts and waterways of the nation (among other roles), but I imagine more than a few aren’t familiar with the CCC; it was a program that helped put people to work during the Great Depression and is just as deserving of recognition as one of our military services is. The third event that is being commemorated by a special event station this month is the flight of a US Navy blimp to the Arctic. It was part of a dual mission utilizing the latest technology of the era and some of the oldest aviation technology.

On the weekend of 4/5 August, a number of amateur radio stations and groups will be operating special event stations in honor of the US Coast Guard’s 228th Anniversary. On 4 August 1790, Congress authorized the Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton to form the United States Revenue Cutter Service, charged with enforcing customs laws. Since there was no United States Navy at the time (it wasn’t re-established until 1798), the Cutter Service also took on additional duties (some of which they still carry out today) as coastal defense, rescue, government transport, and mail transport. In 1915, the Cutter Revenue Service was merged with the United States Lifesaving Service to create the United States Coast Guard. In 1939, the Coast Guard took on additional duties when United States Lighthouse Service was brought under its control. In 1942, the Coast Guard picked up more responsibilities when the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation was put under their control. As a result of these mergers and transfers, the Coast Guard became a multi-role agency with search and rescue, regulatory, and law enforcement duties. Because it can be transferred to military control during wartime, the Coast Guard is also considered one of the nation’s armed forces. During both World War I and World War II, it was transferred to the control of Navy Department and transferred back to the Treasury Department after the wars. After the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001, the Coast Guard was transferred from the Treasury Department to the Department of Homeland Security. The Coast Guard has a significant presence in coastal Georgia, with stations in Savannah and Brunswick, at the port facilities in Savannah and Brunswick, and with Coast Guard Air Station Savannah at Hunter AAF in Savannah.

Citizens Conservation Corps on the Air (CCC on the Air) is 11/12 August (it takes place each year on the second full weekend of August). Amateur radio operators and groups across the country will be setting up and operating from the sites CCC camps and public works projects built by the CCC to honor the work of the Corps and the men it employed. The CCC was was one of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal work relief programs. Between the years of 1933 and 1942, the CCC employed men between the ages of 17 and 28 as unskilled manual laborers to conserve and improve local, state, and federal government owned lands. It served two purposes; it put many unemployed men back to work and improved government lands for the public. One of the most popular of the New Deal programs to relieve unemployment caused by the Great Depression, it also had a lasting impact on the country. Many of the state and federal parks and historic sites we have today are here because of the work the CCC did in reforestation, building programs, and infrastructure improvements. In coastal Georgia, CCC projects included (among many others) Fort Stewart, Fort Pulaski, McKinnon St. Simons Island Airport, the St. Simons Island Coast Guard Station, and the Okefenokee NWR. Look for participating stations on or around 3.550 CW and 3.950 LSB, 7.050 CW and 7.250 LSB, 14.050 CW and 14.250 USB, 21.050 CW and 21.250 USB, and 28.050 CW and 28.350 USB.

On 18 August 2018, the Shea Naval Aviation Museum Amateur Radio Club, W1NAS in South Weymouth, MA will be commemorating the 60th anniversary of the flight of the US Navy blimp Snow Goose from Naval Air Station South Weymouth to Resolute Bay on the Arctic Circle. Prior to finding the listing for this special event station, I didn’t know anything about this flight; while researching it online, I didn’t find much and what I did find seems to conflict with some of the information in the listing on the ARRL’s website (see next paragraph). In late July and August 1958, the ZPG-2 Airship Snow Goose and its crew made the flight for the purpose of evaluating lighter-than-air craft for supporting Arctic science and military missions. The flight took Snow Goose and crew from South Weymouth to Akron, OH to Fort Churchill in Manitoba, Canada to Resolute Bay where they then flew to Ice Island T-3. It was the first airship to fly into the Arctic Circle since it was done by the Graf Zeppelin in July 1931. The flight was 4,700 miles long and the airship never went above 2,100 ft. above sea level. Snow Goose‘s mission was successful, but ultimately it was for naught because the Navy ended that era of airship operations in 1961. W1NAS will be operating on or near 14.250 USB and 7.250 LSB. QSL via Steve Cohn, W1OD, 10 Hemlock Terrace, Randolph, MA 02368.

Both the ARRL listing and one of the sources I found indicate that the Snow Goose‘s mission was concurrent with the USS Nautilus‘s Arctic mission in August 1958. The conflict comes in where the ARRL listing states that the Snow Goose and USS Nautilus maintained communications with each other. Multiple book reviews of Arctic Mission: 90 North by Airship and Submarine by William Althoff, however, state that the two missions were not aware of each other because the Nautilus’ mission was secret whereas the Snow Goose‘s was public (just because the public was told the two missions weren’t’ aware of each, however, doesn’t mean they weren’t – it wouldn’t surprise me if they did maintain communications). The reviews of Arctic Mission also indicate that both missions were a response to the Soviet Union’s Sputnik launch. If you’re interested, the Lighter Than Air Society has a wonderful account of the flight by one of the crew members.  I’m really interested in trying to find out more about this flight, including getting a copy of Althoff’s book if I can find an inexpensive one!

On 25/26 August, KD7ZDO, Clackamas County Amateur Radio Emergency Services in Oregon City, OR will be commemorating the End of the Oregon Trail’s 175th Anniversary.

In addition to these special events, the weekend of 18/19 August is International Lighthouse and Lightship Weekend (ILLW), which along with Museum Ships on the Air Weekend, is one of my favorite amateur radio events of the year. It isn’t unusual for lighthouses and lightships to be landmarks, historic sites, or museums, so ILLW is also a History related event. There is a huge list of participants in this event, so you’re likely to be able to add more than one lighthouse or lightship to you log over the weekend.

History Related Amateur Radio Special Event Stations for July 2018

The month of July sees a lot of Independence Day special event stations as well as the 13 Colonies Special Event (to be honest, it’s almost become more of a contest than a special event), but there are three History related amateur radio special event stations this July that stand out. The first commemorates the Battle of Gettysburg, the largest and probably most well-known battle of the American Civil war. It’s important that we remember the Civil War as an example of what happens when we are unable to govern ourselves and take up arms against each other as a result. The second commemorates the Whiskey Rebellion, one of the first tests of our new government following the American Revolution. Perhaps there was something to learn from the Whiskey Rebellion that both of our political parties overlooked in the years prior to the 2016 Presidential election. The third special event station commemorates the Maryland Slave Rebellion in 1845. The slave rebellion can remind us that even though our country was founded on the concept that “…all men are created equal…” some have always been more equal than others and that not all of us have been free. Independence Day is a time to celebrate our independence and our freedoms but we should also use it, particularly this year, to reflect on where we’ve been and where we’re going, what our Country has been, and what we want it to be.

Bob Hess, WO4L, is operating special event station W1G through 10 July 2018 in remembrance of the Battle of Gettysburg. The Battle of Gettysburg took place from 1 July 1863 to 3 July 1863 around the town of Gettysburg, PA and was not only the largest battle of the Civil War but the largest battle to have occurred in North America. On the first day of the battle, Union cavalry under General John Buford and infantry under General John Reynolds held the line against Confederate forces under General A.P. Hill, allowing Union forces to hold advantageous positions over the Confederates. Day two of the battle was long and bloody; throughout the day more units of the Union Army of the Potomac and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia arrived on the field and were fed into the battle. On Day 3, the Confederates suffered from General Robert E. Lee’s overconfidence and aggressiveness. Over half of the troops he sent against strong Union lines on Cemetery Ridge didn’t return; it was a waste of perfectly good infantry. Both sides took heavy casualties, over 23,000 for the Union and over 28,000 for the Confederates; but the Confederates lost more percentage wise and most importantly lost too many experienced leaders. Along with the surrender of Vicksburg on 4 July 1863, Gettysburg proved to be a turning point in the Civil War. W1G will be active on or around 18.158, 14.288, 7.227, and 3.830. QSL via Robert J Hess, WO4L, 74 Curtis Dr, East Berlin, PA 17316.

From 3 July to 15 July 2018, Washington Amateur Communications in Washington, PA will be operating special event station W3R commemorating the Whiskey Rebellion. The Whiskey Rebellion lasted from 1791 to 1794 in response to a tax on whiskey instituted by the US Government. Suggested by Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton, President George Washington was assured by local officials in Pennsylvania and Virginia that the tax wouldn’t meet much opposition so Washington, in turn, assured Congress that it wouldn’t be a problem. Unfortunately, it seems that those local officials didn’t know or weren’t concerned with the feelings of the western population of their states, because when the tax went into effect it was heavily opposed in the west. Tax officials were met with harassment, resistance, and violence. Hamilton called for troops to be sent in to enforce the tax, but Washington decided to try peace envoys first. The peace initiative failed, so Washington sent in troops under his leadership. As he led 13,000 militia into western Pennsylvania to put down the rebellion, the rebels melted away and only around twenty arrests were made. Most of those arrested were acquitted and those found guilty were pardoned by Washington. Although the Whiskey Tax eventually proved impossible to enforce and was repealed by Congress in 1802, the response to the Whiskey Rebellion was a critical test to the new United States Government. Washinton’s handling of the rebellion proved that the Federal Government could and would put down violent resistance to federal laws. One wonders if the government’s overlooking of the feelings and views of the western citizens before the Whiskey Rebellion was repeated in the overlooking in recent years of the working class that helped bring about the election of President Trump? W3R will be operating on or around 50.300, 18.160, 14.270, and 7.275. QSL for a certificate via William Steffey, Radio Hill, Bells Lake Rd, Prosperity, PA 15329.

On 7 July 2018, the Expatriate Marylanders Radio Club will be operating special event station N3APS to commemorate the Maryland Slave Rebellion of 7-8 July 1845. On 7 July 1845, a group of slaves from Charles County Maryland began moving by road in an attempt to reach freedom in Pennsylvania, approximately 110 miles away. As other slaves along the way joined in, the group became impossible not to notice and were eventually intercepted by a group known as the Montgomery Volunteers. The leaders of the slave group, armed only with a pistol, swords, clubs, and farm implements, decided to give battle. Outgunned, it wasn’t much of a battle, with most of the slaves being captured, some killed, and a few escaping. The Slave Rebellion struck fear into the citizens of the surrounding area, resulting in further restrictions on slaves, “Committees of Vigilance,” and more volunteers for organizations like the Montgomery Volunteers. N3APS will be operating on or near 50.150, 28.325, 14.325, and 7.290. QSL via Expatriate Marylanders Radio Club, P.O. Box 617, Orinda, CA 94563.

 

Amateur Radio and History for March 2018

History related special event station for March 2018 include EI50AOM, which continues from January and February along with several Military History special event stations and a station commemorating the founding of one of the original 13 US Colonies. N4H will commemorate the Creek War/War of 1812 Battle of Horseshoe Bend and K7T will commemorate the Civil War Battle of Picacho Peak. K5B will remember those who died during World War II’s Bataan Death March. K5C will commemorate the commissioning of the battleship USS Texas (BB-35). WM3PEN will commemorate the charter of the Province of Pennsylvania, one of the original 13 US Colonies which became one of the original 13 stats, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

Special event station EI50AOM will operate in Baltimore, County Cork, Ireland from 1 January 2018 to 31 March 2018 in remembrance of the 50th anniversary of the crash of Aer Lingus Flight 712. The callsign combines the aircraft’s registration with the 50th Anniversary of the crash. Aer Lingus Flight 712, a Vickers Viscount 803 with Irish registration EI-AOM crashed on 24 March 2017 near Tuskar Rock, County Wexford, Ireland with 57 passengers and 4 crew aboard; all 61 perished in the crash. The cause of Flight 712’s crash has never been determined. Initial investigations into the crash were not thorough so the crash has been surrounded by controversy. One theory that evolved was that Flight 712 was downed by a missile from a testing facility at RAF Aberporth in Wales; another theory was that it crashed as a result of a collision with an Irish Air Corps training aircraft. A more thorough investigation in 2002 determined that Flight 712 crashed as the result of a mechanical failure stemming from metal fatigue, corrosion, control surface flutter, or a bird strike. Of the 61 fatalities, the remains of only 14 were ever found. EI50AOM will be devoting one day of operations to each person lost in the crash.

EI50AOM will be operating on or around 21.317, 18.127, 14.217, and 7.127. QSL via Tim McKnight, EI2KA, Gortadrohid, Ringarogy Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland. For more information, see:  https://www.qrz.com/db/ei50aom

 

The Oro Valley Amateur radio Club will be operating special event station K7T from Tucson, AZ on 10 March 2018 to commemorate the Battle of Picacho Peak. The Battle of Picacho Peak took place on 15 April 1862 between a patrol of the 1st California Cavalry (Union) and Confederate pickets from the Arizona Rangers (Confederate States) near Picacho Peak between current day Phoenix and Tucson, AZ. To be honest, I’d never heard of this battle until I saw the special event listing, but it was the westernmost battle fought during the American Civil War. Fought between 13 Union Troopers and 10 Arizona Troopers, it was very small unit action. The Arizona Troopers were lying in wait to ambush an oncoming union force of which 1st California Cavalry patrol was a part. Their commander was under orders not to engage with Confederate forces immediately, but to wait for the rest of the Union force to arrive; instead of waiting, he decided to attack. In the attack, he was killed along with two other California Troopers and three others were injured. The Arizona Troopers suffered three captured and maybe two injured. The impatience of the Union patrol leader resulted in delaying an attack by the main Union force and prevented that attack from being the surprise that it was planned to be.

K7T will be CW on or around: 7.040 and 14.040; on PSK on or around 7.070 and 14.070; on FT8: on or around 7.074  and 14.074; and on SSB on or around 7.200 and 14.250. No paper QSL, please. Email for QSL to hfsig@tucsonhamradio.org www.tucsonhamradio.org

 

The Menasco Amateur Radio Club will be operating special event station K5C from Cleburne, TX from 10-14 March 2018 in honor of the commissioning of the USS Texas (BB-35) on 12 March 1914. The USS Texas was a New York class dreadnought battleship armed with 10 14-inch guns, 21 5-inch guns, and an assortment of smaller guns and torpedo tubes. She saw action in both World War I and World War II. During World War I, she served with the Royal Navy Grand Fleet after the United States entered the war, performing convoy escort and blockade duties. During World War II, she participated in the North African campaign, the invasion of Europe, the invasion of southern France, the Battle of Iwo Jima, and the Battle of Okinawa. She was decommissioned in April 1948 and turned over to the State of Texas to become a museum ship, a role she still serves to this day. The USS Texas is the only surviving dreadnought battleship and the only surviving capital ship (primary combat ship) that saw action in both World War I and World War II. The USS Texas is also active on the air via the Battleship Texas Radio Station, NA5DV (her active duty callsign was NADV). I’ve had a QSO with the station on several times and always consider an honor to work a station aboard such a historic ship.

K5C will be active on or around 14.045, 14.324, 7.045, or 7.185. QSL. via Club KC5NX, 9200 Summit Court West, Cleburne, TX 76033. For more information:  kc5nx.radio.club@gmail.com or www.qrz.com/db/kc5nx

 

 

USS_Texas-2
USS Texas (BB-35) in 1919 (Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=397489)

 

 

The Holmesburg Amateur Radio Club, WM3PEN, will operate a special event station from Philidelphia, PA on 11 March 2018 to commemorate Pennsylvania Charter Day. Pennsylvania Charter Day honors the granting of the Province of Pennsylvania to William Penn by King Charles II of England on 4 March 1681. In the Charter, Charles II cited enlarging the empire, trade, and civilization and Christianization of the natives as reasons for granting Penn the colony, but Pennsylvania is considered a Reformation Colony; more than likely, Charles II granted it to William Penn as repayment of debt incurred to Penn’s father during the Stuart Restoration. The Charter laid out the boundaries of the Province, the powers that Penn (and his descendants) would have as proprietor, and what Penn would owe the King annually in return for the grant. Since Charles and his advisors knew that Pennsylvania would have a Quaker majority, a clause was also included that provided for an Anglican clergyman if one was requested by twenty of the Province’s inhabitants. The 1783 Treaty of Paris ended the American Revolution and the American colonies became independent from the British Empire, nullifying the Charter. As a result, Pennsylvania became a Commonwealth and the second of the original 13 states of the United States of America.

WM3PEN will be operating on or near 14.280 and 7.230. QSL via Holmesburg ARC, 3341 Sheffield St, Philadelphia, PA 19136. www.harcnet.org

 

The Mesilla Valley Radio Club will be operating special event station K5B as part of the Las Cruces, NM Bataan Memorial Death March from 23-26 March 2018. The Bataan Memorial Death March is in memorial of the Bataan Death March that occurred during World War II as Japan captured the Philippines. After the defeat of American forces in the Battle of Bataan, which lasted from 7 January to 9 April 1942, the Japanese began a forced march of Filippino and American Prisoners of War from Bataan to Capas over a distance of 60-70 miles. In all sense of the words, the march was a war crime. Prisoners were rarely fed or given water. Those that were unable to continue the march were killed. Prisoners were randomly beaten and killed by their captors. What medical care that was available was provided by American doctors among the POWs, no medical care was provided by the Japanese. Somewhere between 60,000 and 80,000 POWs began the march; sources on the number of deaths vary, but between 5,000-18,000 Filipinos died and between 500-650 Americans died during the march. After the war, the Japanese commander of the Philippines, General Masaharu Homma was arrested and tried by a war tribunal for war crimes related to the Bataan Death March; he was found convicted on 11 February 1946 and executed on 3 March 1946 in Manila.

The special event listing submitted to the ARRL does not include any HF frequency or QSL information; QRZ lists the club’s address as Mesilla Valley Radio Club, PO Box 1443,
Las Cruces, NM 88004.

 

The Lake Martin Amateur Radio Club will be operating special event station N4H on 24 March 2018 in Alexander City, AL to commemorate the 203rd anniversary of the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. The Battle of Horseshoe Bend took place on 27 March 1814 near Dadeville, AL within a bend of the Tallapoosa River known as Horseshoe Bend. The battle put an end to the Creek War, which ran concurrently with the War of 1812. The Creek war pitted the Upper Creek tribe, who were allied with the British in the War of 1812 against the Lower Creek tribe who were allied with the United States during the War o 1812. The American forces were led by Andrew Jackson, who at the time was a Major General in the Tennessee militia. Attacking the Upper Creek position from both the front and rear, Jackson’s forces eventually overwhelmed the Upper Creeks and the battle turned into a slaughter. The American and Lower Creek forces suffered around 60 dead and 154 wounded but the Upper Creeks suffered somewhere around 800-850 dead. In addition to Upper Creek warriors killed during the battle, others were killed when timber they were hiding in was burned and others were killed as they tried to swim the river in retreat. Against orders from the Federal government, Jackson negotiated the Treaty of Fort Jackson, which approximately 20 million acres from mostly the Upper Creeks to the United States. It was the beginning of the end for both the Upper Creeks and the friendly Lower Creeks, however. Alabama and Georgia continued to grow and the Creeks were pushed out of their lands. Eventually, the Creeks were one of the five tribes removed from the southeast during the “Trail of Tears.”

N4H will be active on or around 14.200 and 7.250. Certificate & QSL. Michael Courtney, 96 Alabama Drive, Alexander City, AL 35010

 

It’s also worth mentioning that NASA’s Amateur Radio Clubs will be on the air throughout 2018 as part of a year-long special event “NASA on the Air.” They’ll be commemorating events such as the 60th anniversary of NASA’s founding on 29 July 1958, the 20th anniversary of the launch of the first element of the International Space Station on 20 November 1998, the 20th anniversary of the launch of the International Space Station’s Node 1 on 4 December 1998, and the 50th anniversary of Apollo 8’s launch on 21 December 1968 and splashdown on 27 December 1968. The clubs will also be on the air for other occasions throughout the year. You can keep up with the events and when the clubs will be on the air by checking their website or following NASA Radio Clubs on Twitter.

 


 

If you’re interested in reading more about the events encompassed by this month’s special event stations, here are some that I’ve read and suggest:

  1. The War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict by Donald R. Hickey
  2. Castles of Steel: Britain, Germany, and the Winning of the Great War at Sea by Robert K. Massie
  3. Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 by Ian W. Toll

 

Amateur Radio and History for February 2018

History related Amateur Radio special event stations in February 2018 include stations related to an aircraft crash in Ireland (continued from January), King Hussein of Jordan, the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, the Space Shuttle Columbia, the Battle of Iwo Jima in World War II, the Civil War submarine Hunley, and a shipwreck in 1918. There will also be special event stations remembering President George Washington, but I thought my readers would be familiar enough with him that I wouldn’t need to write a paragraph about him.

Special event station EI50AOM will operate in Baltimore, County Cork, Ireland from 1 January 2018 to 31 March 2018 in remembrance of the 50th anniversary of the crash of Aer Lingus Flight 712. The callsign combines the aircraft’s registration with the 50th Anniversary of the crash. Aer Lingus Flight 712, a Vickers Viscount 803 with Irish registration EI-AOM crashed on 24 March 2017 near Tuskar Rock, County Wexford, Ireland with 57 passengers and 4 crew aboard; all 61 perished in the crash. The cause of Flight 712’s crash has never been determined. Initial investigations into the crash were not thorough so the crash has been surrounded by controversy. One theory that evolved was that Flight 712 was downed by a missile from a testing facility at RAF Aberporth in Wales; another theory was that it crashed as a result of a collision with an Irish Air Corps training aircraft. A more thorough investigation in 2002 determined that Flight 712 crashed as the result of a mechanical failure stemming from metal fatigue, corrosion, control surface flutter, or a bird strike. Of the 61 fatalities, the remains of only 14 were ever found. EI50AOM will be devoting one day of operations to each person lost in the crash.

EI50AOM will be operating on or around 21.317, 18.127, 14.217, and 7.127. QSL via Tim McKnight, EI2KA, Gortadrohid, Ringarogy Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland. For more information, see:  https://www.qrz.com/db/ei50aom

 

A variety of stations will be operating as special event stations during the month of February in memory of King Hussein bin Talal of Jordan. For more information on participating stations, see the JY1 Special Event Memorial Station website. King Hussein ruled Jordan through a tumultuous portion of Jordan’s history from 1952 to 1999. Throughout his reign, King Hussein found himself in an unenviable position, both geographically and policy-wise; he was between Israel and the west on one side and the Palestinians, other Islamic and Arab nations, and the Soviet Bloc on the other. Regardless, his reign was a positive one; Jordan was better off when he passed than when he ascended to the throne. Quality of life and literacy in Jordan, its economy, and its infrastructure all improved throughout his reign. King Hussein was an enthusiastic amateur radio operator, active under the callsign JY1, so an amateur radio special event station in his honor is a fitting way to remember such a historic leader.

JY1 special event stations will be operating on or around 14.250, 14.025, 7.185,  and 7.025. QSL via Ayman J. Azar, 8261 Decatur St, Lake Station, IN 46405.

 

Special event station K7T will operate in Tucson, AZ on 3 February 2018 to commemorate the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, which ended the Mexican American War of 1846-1848. In addition to monetary settlements, the treaty ceded to the United States from Mexico territory that would eventually part of 10 western states. Controversy over whether those territories and states would be free or slave would help lead to the Civil War just over a decade later.

K7T will be operating on or around 14.250, 14.070, 7.200, and 7.070. QSL via Oro Valley ARC, via e-mail only to, hfsig@tucsosnhamradio.org for PDF. No paper QSLs, please. Email hfsig@tucsosnhamradio.org for PDF certificate. www.tucsonhamradio.org

 

The Nacogdoches Amateur Radio Club will be operating special event station K5C on 3 and 4 February 2018 in memory of the astronauts that perished in the shuttle Columbia crash and in honor of the amateur radio operators who assisted in recovery efforts. Columbia was returning from the STS-107 mission when it disintegrated over Texas and Louisiana killing all aboard: Rick Husband, William McCool, Michael Anderson, Kalpana Chawla, David Brown, Laurel Clark, and Ilan Ramon. It was determined that the cause of the crash was by hot atmospheric damage penetrating Columbia’s heat shield and damaging its structural integrity through damage caused pieces of foam insulation that came off of the external fuel tank during launch. After the crash, a multitude of volunteers responded to the area to help search for debris, which was spread across a massive area. Among those volunteers were amateur radio operators who provided key communications support for the search.

K5C will be active on or around 21.350, 14.270, and 7.220. QSL via Nacogdoches Amateur Radio Club, 167 CR 2093, Nacogdoches, TX 75965. w5nac.com

 

On 10 February 2018, NI6IW at the USS Midway (CV-41) in San Diego, CA will operate as a special event station in commemoration of the US Marine Corps raising the American flag on Mt. Suribachi during the Battle for Iwo Jima. The invasion of Iwo Jima began on 19 February 1945 with the goal of depriving the Japanese the use of its airfields and utilizing them as emergency landing fields for B-29s that were attacking Japan from the Marianas. Mt. Suribachi was the islands high ground and the Japanese were tunneled into it with firepower that could range the island, so it was an important early target. It was taken on 23 February 1945 and on that day the iconic Joe Rosenthal’s photo of the flag being raised was taken. Rosenthal’s photo, however, was of the second raising; a small flag had been raised first and Rosenthal captured the image of the second group of Marines replacing it with a larger flag.

NI6IW will be active on or around 14.320 and 7.250, on PSK31 on 14.070, and on D-STAR on REF001C. QSL via USS Midway (Cv-41) COMEDTRA, 910 N Harbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92101.

 

The Trident Amateur Radio Club will be operating special event station N4HLH from Charleston, SC on 17 February 2018 in commemoration of the submarine Hunley sinking the USS Housatonic in Charleston Harbor during the Civil War. The Hunley was built in Mobile, AL and transported to Charleston, where she sank twice during testing, killing 13 crew members. On 17 February 1864, the Hunley attacked the USS Housatonic at the entrance of Charleston Harbor in an attempt to break the Union blockade of the city.; it was the first successful attack by a submarine on a surface ship, using her spar torpedo. The Housatonic sank in five minutes, but the Hunley did not survive the attack either, sinking after the torpedo exploded. There is some debate about how the Hunley‘s crew died, but they likely died due to blast injury caused when the spar torpedo exploded (the spar torpedo being too far away from the rest of the submarine to prevent damage).  The Hunley wasn’t located until 1995 and was raised in 2000; she is now on display at the Warren Lasch Conservation Center in Charleston, SC.

N4HLH will be active on or around 28.462, 14.262, 7.262, and 7.117 as well as the SC Hearts linked repeater system. QSL via Brian Freedman W4BFZ, PO Box 60732, North Charleston, SC 29419. A certificate is $5 and SASE 9X12 envelope. For QSL send card and SASE. tridenthams.org/hunley.htm

 

The Society of Newfoundland Amateurs will be operating special event station VO1MZL from St. John’s, Newfoundland on 23 and 24 February 2018 in memory of the sinking of the SS Florizel. Commissioned in 1909, the SS Florizel was a passenger liner specially designed for traveling through icy water and was the flagship of the Red Cross Line. On 23 February 1918, she left port in St. John’s, Newfoundland en route to New York with 78 passengers and 68 crew aboard. The Chief Engineer ignored the Captain’s orders for full speed in order to prolong the voyage enough to result in a layover at Halifax where he could visit family, as a result, the Captain ordered a turn too early and the ship ran into rocks at Horn Head Point. Most of the survivors took shelter in the ship’s Marconi Shack, from which an SOS message was sent. Despite the SOS and subsequent rescue efforts, only 44 survived the crash. The special event callsign, VO1MZL is based on the Florizel‘s callsign MZL.

VO1MZL will be operating on or around 14.200 (hopefully they move up a bit for us General-class hams). QSL via Admiralty House Communications Museum, 365 Old Placentia Road, Mount Pearl, NL A1N0G7, Canada. http://www.admiraltymuseum.ca/

 

It’s also worth mentioning that NASA’s Amateur Radio Clubs will be on the air throughout 2018 as part of a year-long special event “NASA on the Air.” They’ll be commemorating events such as the 60th anniversary of NASA’s founding on 29 July 1958, the 20th anniversary of the launch of the first element of the International Space Station on 20 November 1998, the 20th anniversary of the launch of the International Space Station’s Node 1 on 4 December 1998, and the 50th anniversary of Apollo 8’s launch on 21 December 1968 and splashdown on 27 December 1968. The clubs will also be on the air for other occasions throughout the year. You can keep up with the events and when the clubs will be on the air by checking their website or following NASA Radio Clubs on Twitter.

 


 

If you’re interested in reading more about the events encompassed by this month’s special event stations, here are some that I’ve read and suggest: