3rd Combat Aviation Brigade Aircraft Update; 6 September 2018

Savannah – Last week I posted about Hunter AAF’s 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade flying again after their return from a deployment; this week I’ve got an update to the list of aircraft I began in that post. Since then, I’ve heard a few more new aircraft, so the list has grown. Thanks to information from readers about the fiscal years, this update also changes the question marks in some of the tail numbers to fiscal years and more monitoring opportunities have firmed up some unit associations.

ARMY 26458, UH-60L, 92-26458, A/2-3 AVN?)
ARMY 26482 (UH-60L, 93-26482, A/2-3 AVN?)
ARMY 26587 (UH-60L, 94-26587, A/2-3 AVN?)1
ARMY 26596 (UH-60L, 95-26596, A/2-3 AVN?)1
ARMY 26812 (UH-60L, 98-26812, A/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 26830 (UH-60L, 99-26830, A/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 26841 (UH-60L, 99-26841, A/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 27055 (UH-60L, 05-27055, A/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 08171 (CH-47F, 14-08171, B/2-3 AVN?)
ARMY 08454 (CH-47F, 14-08454, B/2-3 AVN?)
ARMY 08455 (CH-47F, 14-08455, B/2-3 AVN?)
ARMY 08456 (CH-47F, 14-08456, B/2-3 AVN?)
ARMY 08457 (CH-47F, 14-08457, B/2-3 AVN?)
ARMY 08460 (CH-47F, 14-08460, B/2-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20505 (HH-60M, 12-20505, C/2-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20615 (HH-60M, 13-20615, C/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 20616 (HH-60M, 13-20616, C/2-3 AVN)

ARMY 35395 (AH-64D, 03-05395, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 35403 (AH-64D, 03-05403, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 75518 (AH-64D, 07-05518, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 77045 (AH-64D, 07-07045, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 77046 (AH-64D, 07-07046, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 87048 (AH-64D, 08-07048, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95591 (AH-64D, 09-05591, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95592 (AH-64D, 09-05592, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95593 (AH-64D, 09-05593, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95602 (AH-64D, 09-05602, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95604 (AH-64D, 09-05604, 3-17 CAV)

ARMY 20354 (UH-60M, 11-20354, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20358 (UH-60M, 11-20358, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20360 (UH-60M, 11-20360, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20362 (UH-60M, 11-20362, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20366 (UH-60M, 11-20366, 4-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20387 (UH-60M, 11-20387, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20388 (UH-60M, 11-20388, 4-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20392 (UH-60M, 11-20392, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20395 (UH-60M, 11-20395, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20397 (UH-60M, 11-20397, 4-3 AVN)22
ARMY 20402 (UH-60M, 11-20402, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20404 (UH-60M, 11-20404, 4-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20409 (UH-60M, 11-20409, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20416 (UH-60M, 11-20416, 4-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20422 (UH-60M, 11-20422, 4-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20450 (UH-60M, 12-20450, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20455 (UH-60M, 12-20455, 4-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20458 (UH-60M, 12-20458, 4-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20460 (UH-60M, 12-20460, 4-3 AVN?)

As I hear more 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade aircraft and am able to identify them, I’ll add them to the list and post more updates. As always, updates and corrections are requested.


  1. 94-26587 and 95-26596 were previously heard as A/2-3 AVN aircraft until 2009 but unheard between 2009 and 2018. I’m guessing both are still A/2-3 AVN aircraft because C/2-3 AVN converted to the HH-60M and 4-3 AVN converted to the UH-60M.
  2. The unit associations for these aircraft are based on traffic heard on other frequencies including Base Ops and Battalion Ops frequencies.

3rd Combat Aviation Brigade Post Deployment Update; 30 August 2018

Savannah – Last week, I posted that the 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade is back in the air following its return from a deployment.  During my last couple of visits home in Savannah, I’ve had the chance to monitor their evening activity so in turn, I’ve been able to update the current list of 3rd Combat Aviation Aircraft. Aircraft with question marks after the unit designation are educated guesses on the unit and are unconfirmed at this time; see the footnotes for further information.

ARMY 26587 (UH-60L, 94-26587, A/2-3 AVN?)1
ARMY 26812 (UH-60L, 98-26812, A/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 26830 (UH-60L, 99-26830, A/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 26841 (UH-60L, 99-26841, A/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 27055 (UH-60L, 05-27055, A/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 08454 (CH-47F, 14-08454, B/2-3 AVN?)
ARMY 08455 (CH-47F, 14-08455, B/2-3 AVN?)
ARMY 08460 (CH-47F, 14-08460, B/2-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20615 (HH-60M, 13-20615, C/2-3 AVN)

ARMY 75518 (AH-64D, 07-05518, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 77045 (AH-64D, 07-07045, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 77046 (AH-64D, 07-07046, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 87048 (AH-64D, 08-07048, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95591 (AH-64D, 09-05591, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95592 (AH-64D, 09-05592, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95593 (AH-64D, 09-05593, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95602 (AH-64D, 09-05602, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95604 (AH-64D, 09-05604, 3-17 CAV)

ARMY 20360 (UH-60M, ??-20360, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20362 (UH-60M, ??-20362, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20366 (UH-60M, ??-20366, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20387 (UH-60M, ??-20387, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20388 (UH-60M, ??-20388, 4-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20392 (UH-60M, ??-20392, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20397 (UH-60M, ??-20397, 4-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20409 (UH-60M, ??-20409, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20416 (UH-60M, ??-20416, 4-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20422 (UH-60M, ??-20422, 4-3 AVN)2
ARMY 20450 (UH-60M, ??-20450, 4-3 AVN?)
ARMY 20460 (UH-60M, ??-20460, 4-3 AVN?)

For those that may not be familiar, the 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade is organized into three flying battalions. 2-3 AVN is the General Support Aviation Battalion; its A Company flies UH-60Ls, its B Company flies CH-47Fs, and its C Company flies HH-60Ms. 3-17 Cavalry is the Attack Helicopter Squadron and flies AH-64Ds. 4-3 AVN is the Assault Helicopter Battalion and flies UH-60Ms.

As I hear more 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade aircraft and am able to identify them, I’ll add them to the list and post more updates. As always, updates and corrections are requested.


  1. 94-26587 was previously an A/2-3 AVN aircraft was heard up until 2009 but not heard between 2009 and 2018. I’m guessing it is still an A/2-3 AVN aircraft because C/2-3 AVN converted to the HH-60M and 4-3 AVN converted to the UH-60M.
  2. The identification of 20388, 20397, 20416, and 20422 as 4-3 AVN UH-60Ms comes from logging them on 4-3 AVN’s Ops frequency 43.625 NFM.

The 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade is Back in the Savannah Skies After Returning From Deployment

Savannah – A few extra days in Savannah than normal this past week gave me the opportunity to catch the aircraft of the 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade at Hunter AAF flying after their recent return from deployment. For the last year, the skies over Savannah have been bereft of the Brigade’s UH-60s, CH-47s, and AH-64s so it’s been nice to see and hear them back overhead.

So far, I’ve heard UH-60Ls and an HH-60M from 2-3 AVN and AH-64s from 3-17 CAV that were assigned to those units prior to their deployment. Those familiar aircraft have been:

  • ARMY 26812 (UH-60L, 98-26812, A/2-3 AVN)
  • ARMY 26841 (UH-60L, 99-26841, A/2-3 AVN)
  • ARMY 20615 (HH-60M, 13-20615, C/2-3 AVN)
  • ARMY 75518 (AH-64D, 07-05518, 3-17 CAV)
  • ARMY 77045 (AH-64D, 07-07045, 3-17 Cav)
  • ARMY 77046 (AH-64D, 07-07046, 3-17 CAV)
  • ARMY 87048 (AH-64D, 08-07048, 3-17 CAV)
  • ARMY 95592 (AH-64D, 09-05592, 3-17 CAV)
  • ARMY 95593 (AH-64D, 09-05593, 3-17 CAV)
  • ARMY 95602 (AH-64D, 09-05602, 3-17 CAV)

I have not heard any familiar aircraft from B/2-3 AVN or 4-3 AVN since the Brigade returned. I have, however, heard some CH-47Fs and UH-60Ms previously not associated with either unit that could be replacement aircraft. Their crews have seemed familiar with Hunter AAF and the Fort Stewart airspace, so I don’t think they’re from a visiting unit; I think the CH-47Fs are replacement aircraft for B/2-3 AVN and the UH-60Ms are replacement aircraft for 4-3 AVN but until something is heard or seen to confirm it, those are just guesses for now.

  • ARMY 08454 (CH-47F, 14-08454, B/2-3 AVN?)
  • ARMY 08455 (CH-47F, 14-08455, B/2-3 AVN?)
  • ARMY 08460 (CH-47F, 14-08460, B/2-3 AVN?)
  • ARMY 20360 (UH-60M, ??-20360, 4-3 AVN?)
  • ARMY 20362 (UH-60M, ??-20362, 4-3 AVN?)
  • ARMY 20387 (UH-60M, ??-20387, 4-3 AVN?)
  • ARMY 20416 (UH-60M, ??-20416, 4-3 AVN?)

Over a period of time, monitoring should suss things out. As it does, I’ll post some more updates. As always if you happen to hear or come across anything, feel free to submit it in the comments and I’ll add it to the list.

 

The National Infantry Museum at Fort Benning, Georgia

Columbus – Yesterday I visited the National Infantry Museum at Fort Benning in Columbus, GA. I love military history, but I’ve always been more interested in naval military history and the history of air combat so this visit was quite a learning opportunity. The National Infantry Museum tells the story of the US Army Infantry from the Revolutionary War to the present day and includes a section on the history of Armor and Cavalry as well. It also tells the story of Fort Benning, the Rangers, and the Officer Candidate School. Behind the museum is a World War II Company Street  featuring strutures, including a chapel, saved from Fort Benning’s history and relocated to the museum grounds. The museum also features a Walk of Honor and a 3/4 scale replica of the Vietnam Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C.

The first display in the museum is the “Last 100 Yards.” You walk up a 100 yard long ramp that represents the last 100 yards of an infantryman’s fight featuring battles from the Revolutionary War to our present wars in the Middle East. It truly is a magnificent display; you walk through the fight for Redoubt 10 at Yorktown, across the bridge at Antietam, through the World War I Battle of Soissons, through the fight for Pointe du Hoc on D-Day, at the Airborne landing at Corregidor, at Hill 180 for Millett’s bayonet charge during the Korean War, at LZ X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley during Vietnam, and in the midst of a night reconnaissance mission in Iraq. The display uses equipment displays, lights, sounds, and videos projected against the surroundings to put you in each battle. While walking the 100 yards, you not only see what the American infantryman has been through, you learn how he has and warfare have developed over the last 250 years.

Lt. Colonel Alexander Hamilton leads his men against Redoubt 10 at the Revolutionary War Battle of Yorktown
Lt. Colonel Alexander Hamilton leads his men against Redoubt 10 at the Revolutionary War Battle of Yorktown
As you cross the bridge over Antietam Creek you face a Confederate Infantryman
As you cross the bridge over Antietam Creek you face a Confederate Infantryman
The American attack in the World War I Battle of Soissons
The American attack in the World War I Battle of Soissons
Rangers at the bottom of Pointe Du Hoc during the D-Day Invasion at Normandy
Rangers at the bottom of Pointe Du Hoc during the D-Day Invasion at Normandy
The parachute landing during at Corregidor Island in the Philippines during World War II
The parachute landing during at Corregidor Island in the Philippines during World War II
Millett's bayonet charge at Hill 180 during the Korean War
Millett’s bayonet charge at Hill 180 during the Korean War
You walk through the landing at LZ X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley during the Vietnam War
You walk through the landing at LZ X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley during the Vietnam War
Walking through a night reconnaissance mission in Iraq
Walking through a night reconnaissance mission in Iraq

The museum has a huge collection of artifacts, weapons, equipment, vehicles, and memorabilia that covers the history of the US Army from the Revolutionary War to Iraq and Afghanistan. Many are things you just don’t get to see very often.

Porthole from the USS Maine; the Maine's explosion helped spark the Spanish-American War
Porthole from the USS Maine; the Maine’s explosion helped spark the Spanish-American War
Flags, weapons, and artifacts from the Philippine Insurrection
Flags, weapons, and artifacts from the Philippine Insurrection
A World War I Renault FT tank; it was found in a Kabul scrapyard and restored for display in the museum
A World War I Renault FT tank; it was found in a Kabul scrapyard and restored for display in the museum
An M-3 Stuart tank with a horse cavalryman alongside; I thought this an excellent display highlighting the transition from horse Cavalry to Armor
An M-3 Stuart tank with a horse cavalryman alongside; I thought this an excellent display highlighting the transition from horse Cavalry to Armor
An M-113 armored personnel carrier in use during the Vietnam War
An M-113 armored personnel carrier in use during the Vietnam War
The item on the right in this photo is one of Benito Mussolini's epaulets
The item on the right in this photo is one of Benito Mussolini’s epaulets
American flag handmade by US POWs during World War II
American flag handmade by US POWs during World War II
Hermann Goering's Marshal's baton
Hermann Goering’s Marshal’s baton
A bust of Adolf Hitler and a chunk of Hitler's marble table
A bust of Adolf Hitler and a chunk of Hitler’s marble table
Davy Crockett tactical nuclear recoilless gun. Perhaps one of the most insane weapons every devised
Davy Crockett tactical nuclear recoilless gun. Perhaps one of the most insane weapons every devised
Somali flag captured by 3/75 Rangers in Mogadishu; if you've read or watched
Somali flag captured by 3/75 Rangers in Mogadishu; if you’ve read or watched “Blackhawk Down,” you’ll recognize some of the names and callsigns on it
This display recreates a photo taken during the operation in which Saddam Hussein was captured
This display recreates a photo taken during the operation in which Saddam Hussein was captured

Behind the museum is a Walk of Honor that features memorials and monuments placed by and for various US Army Units. The most striking, emotional, and moving is “United in Sacrifice,” commissioned by the 25th Infantry Division Memorial Fund. It features soldiers from different wars of the modern era before the boots, rifle, and helmet of a fallen comrade. The detail and emotions in the facial expressions and postures of the soldiers is incredible. The way a soldier from history reaches out toward a soldier of today is striking. POW/MIA bracelets. dogtags, and flags placed on the rifle by visitors just magnify the impact of the memorial. Another favorite was a memorial to fallen snipers. If you visit the National Infantry Museum, the Walk of Honor is something you should not miss.

United in Sacrifice
United in Sacrifice
Flags, POW/MIA bracelets, and dogtags placed on United in Sacrifice by visitors
Flags, POW/MIA bracelets, and dogtags placed on United in Sacrifice by visitors
The detail and emotion of the soldiers in United in Sacrifice is incredible
The detail and emotion of the soldiers in United in Sacrifice is incredible
A soldier from history reaches out to a soldier of today
A soldier from history reaches out to a soldier of today
Memorial for fallen snipers
Memorial for fallen snipers

The National Infantry Museum is an outstanding museum. There is something for everyone, from someone who knows nothing about military history, who will learn much about the American Infantryman to the military history geek who will enjoy the massive number of displays. It’s worth the visit just for the opening “100 Yards” and it just gets better from there. It doesn’t just tell the story of the US Army Infantry though units and things, it tells the story through the stories of individuals – from the common Infantryman to the General Officers; you learn not just about the Infantry but about men and their deeds and courage. The quantity and quality of the displays and collection reminds me of the National Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola and it compares favorably to it. For anyone interested in Military History, the National Infantry Museum is a must visit. I spent five hours walking through the exhibits and could have spent many more – I’m thrilled that this was on my choices for this year’s visits.

Hunter AAF Helicopter Tailnumbers

For my friends and readers who are aircraft spotters, here are tail numbers for 3rd AVN aircraft that I’ve monitored since the 3rd AVN Brigade began flying again.  Unit identifications are based on which battalion ops frequency the helicopter has been heard reporting in to.  I’ll update this list in the future as I hear more.   Note that the first numbers in the OH-58D callsigns do not always seem to equate to the actual tailnumber year for some reason.

1-3 AVN
65004 – AH-64D
75025 – AH-64D
95097 – AH-64D
95111 – AH-64D
95115 – AH-64D
95117 – AH-64D
95118 – AH-64D
95120 – AH-64D
95141 – AH-64D

2-3 AVN
26595 – UH-60L, A/2-3 AVN
26717 – UH-60L, A/2-3 AVN
23956 – UH-60A, C/2-3 AVN
24428 – UH-60A, C/2-3 AVN

4-3 AVN
26635 – UH-60L
26693 – UH-60L
26707 – UH-60L
26714 – UH-60L
27045 – UH-60L
27048 – UH-60L

3-17 CAV
00537 – OH-58D
00542 – OH-58D
00561 – OH-58D
00964 – OH-58D