Coastal Georgia Mode-S Logs; May 2018

Mode-S hits from Military, Government, and Public Safety related aircraft as well as various other aircraft that catch my attention from attended monitoring of my RadarBox in Savannah and RadarBox Micro in Brunswick, GA.

CGX82CG
COAST GUARD AUXILIARY N82CG (M20T, N82CG, Gorman Aviation) on Mode-S/ADS-B on 7 May 2018; I’ve noticed recently that Coast Guard Auxiliary flights have recently been using CGX prefixes in the callsign block
OPEC76
ADS-B track of OPEC 76 (KC-10A, 87-0121, 305th AMW) on 11 May 2018
GRYHK31
ADS-B Track of GREYHAWK 31 (C-2A, 162148, VAW-120) on 16 May 2018
GRIFN13
ADS-B track of GRIFFIN 13 (P-8A, 169011, VP-5/CPRW-11) on 11 May 2018
EVAL 18 Wassaw 2
ADS-B track of EVAL 18 (MC-12S, 12-00281, US Army) on 23 May 2018
EAGLE69
ADS-B track of EAGLE 69 (C-17A, 01-0193, 15th AS) on 7 May 2018; it’s somewhat unusual to see a C-17 send ADS-B data

06A1CA – Gulfstream?, Qatar Executive (QQE460)
43EAEC – G-450, M-LFBB, Ovation Two Ltd (GULFTEST 94 on ATC)
A229F4 – Bell 206L-1, N239AE, AirEvac 96 Jesup (N239AE)
A2A071 – Bell 206L-3, N269AE, AirEvac 91 Vidalia (N269AE)
A30BC9 – Bell 206L-1, N296AE, AirEvac 95 Statesboro (N296AE)
A35644 – G650, N314GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF47)
A37DC3 – G650, N324GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF64)
A38DAA – C-146, 15-3086, 492nd SOW (MAGMA89)
A4B1F8 – G450, N401SR, Gulfstream Leasing (GLF47)
A4C7AD – Bell 407, N407LS, Air Methods (LIFESTAR 1 on ATC)
A63A87 – G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF67)
A64973 – G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF93)
A64973 – G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (N504GS)
A6A36E – MD-500N, N527FB, Chatham Co (EAGLE 03 on ATC)
A6AE19 – Bell 206L-1, N53AE, AirEvac (N53AE) (AirEvac 90?)
A6B979 – G-V, N532SP, Gulfstream Leasing (BOLEX 80 on ATC?)
A72EEF – G550, N562GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF45)
A76901 – G550, N577GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF66)
A76901 – G550, N577GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GULFTEST 11 on ATC)
A7CB8D – G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF50)
A7CB8D – G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF51)
A7CB8D – G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF52)
A7CB8D – G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF83)
A84978 – G650, N633GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF29)
A84D2F – G650, N634GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF29)
A84D2F – G650, N634GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF35)
A850E9 – N635GD, G650, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF48)
A88D66 – G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF83)
A9F324 – G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF41)
AA17AF – BE30, N75, FAA (FLC75)
ADDE07 – HC-130H, 1503, CGAS Clearwater
ADFD73 – C-26D, 91-00503, WI ARNG (PAT 145 on ATC)
ADFDC9 – C-130H3, 95-1563, 165th AW (RCH369 on box, DAWG 63 on ATC)
ADFDC9 – C-130H3, 95-1563, 165th AW (RCH445)
ADFDCF – RC-12R, 92-03327, RDECOM-CERDEC (PAT327 on box, MYSTIC 27 on ATC)
ADFDEA – C-130H3, 94-6705, 165th AW (DAWG05)
ADFDEC – C-130H3, 94-6707, 165th AW (DAWG07 on box, REACH 305T on ATC)
ADFDEC – C-130H3, 94-6707, 165th AW (DAWG07)
ADFE54 – C-12V, 94-00325, WA ARNG (PAT100)
ADFE71 – C-130H, 92-1534, 153rd AW (TETON34)
ADFEBD – UC-35A, 96-0107, C/2-228 AVN
ADFED5 – C-12U, 85-01267, OSACOM VA RFC
ADFEDE – C-12T, 86-00088, FL ARNG (PAT060)
AE0175 – C-21A, 84-0120, 119th Wing (SPAR232)
AE0191 – C-21A, 84-0124, 103rd FW (HUSLR02)
AE0233 – KC-10A, 87-0121, 305th AMW (B H on box, REACH 251 on ATC)
AE0233 – KC-10A, 87-0121, 305th AMW (OPEC76)
AE02F0 – C-130H, 85-1367, 154th TAS? (HAWG72 on box, PROPS 93 on ATC)
AE0314 – C-130H, 74-1680, 103rd AW (YANKEE 43 on ATC)
AE0358 – KC-135R, 57-1427, 190th AW (WYLIE61)
AE036D – UC-35A, 98-00007, PATD (PAT 007 on ATC)
AE036E – UC-35A, 98-0008, US Army (PAT 008 on ATC)
AE036E – UC-35A, 98-0008, US Army (PAT008)
AE0463 – C-2A, 162148, VAW-120 (GRYHK31)
AE0477 – KC-135R, 58-0038, 914th ARW (BISON83)
AE04B2 – KC-135R, 57-1453, 117th ARW (DIXIE 93 on ATC)
AE04E1 – KC-135R, 58-0120, 186th ARW (KEYS83)
AE055E – C-5M, 85-0001, 436th AW (JUMBO70)
AE062B – KC-135R, 60-0353, 6th AMW/927th ARW (PIRAT37)
AE0671 – KC-135R, 63-8000, 92nd ARW (ROOK93)
AE0681 – KC-135T, 58-0086, 141st ARW (EXPO81)
AE0691 – KC-135R, 62-3572, 190th AW (WYLIE61)
AE06D9 – UC-12F, 163561, MCAS New River (KBAR 561 on ATC)
AE06E4 – UC-12M, 163836, MCAS Beaufort
AE0752 – RC-12F, 163563, VXS-1 (WARLOCK 04 on ATC)
AE087F – C-37A, 01-0029, 6th AMW
AE093B – UC-35B, 00-01052, OSACOM PATD (ARMY 01052 on ATC)
AE10BC – C-17A, 01-0193, 15th AS (EAGLE69)
AE1165 – C-40C, 02-0201, 113th Wing (BOXER42)
AE118A – C-37A, 02-01863, OSACOM Andrews (R1863)
AE1192 – UC-35D, 166474, VMR-1 (LOBO920)
AE11E4 – E-3G, 78-0576, 960th ACCS (SNTRY06)
AE13CB – T-6A, 04-3757, 14th FTW
AE146C – AE146C – C-17A, 07-7174, 436th AW (ROYAL40)
AE146C – C-17A, 07-7174, 436th AW (RCH414)
AE1532 – C-130J, 06-4634, 19th AW (E64634)
AE1722 – T-6A, 06-3816, 14th FTW
AE1D2A – P-3C, 162093, VP-30 (NAVY LL 58 on ATC)
AE1D45 – P-3C, 161127, VP-62 (NAVY LT 621 on ATC)
AE1D72 – P-3C, 162318, VP-30 (NAVY LL 03 on ATC)
AE20CA – C-17A, 07-7189, 437th/315th AW (IMPAC88 on box, BASCO 50 flight on ATC)
AE2674 – MH-65D, 6526, CGAS Savannah
AE2679 – MH-65D, 6531, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6531)
AE2686 – MH-65D, 6547, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6547)
AE2699 – MH-65D, 6567, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6567)
AE2EBB – M20T, N82CG, Gorman Aviation (CGX82CG)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY18)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY64)
AE49C2 – C-17A, 09-9206, 437th/315th AW (BASCO41)
AE4E08 – C-130J, 08-5712, 317th AG (RCHA612)
AE4E0E – C-130J, 11-5732, 317th AG (RCHA612)
AE4E0F – C-130J, 11-5734, 19th AW (SHARK31)
AE4E17 – HC-130J, 11-5725, 71st RQS (KING35)
AE4EB3 – P-8A, 168429, VP-30 (VVLL855)
AE4EB3 – P-8A, 168429, VP-30 (VVLL860)
AE4EBB – P-8A, 168437, VP-16 (0000000 on box, TALON 18 on ATC)
AE4EBC – P-8A, 168438, VP-5 (MADFOX 11 on ATC)
AE4EC7 – P-8A, 168762, VP-16 (TALON1)
AE4EC8 – P-8A, 168763, VP-26 (TRIDENT 02 on ATC)
AE509F – MH-65D, 6544, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6544)
AE53FD – MC-12S, 12-00281, US Army (EVAL18)
AE54D2 – HC-130J, 12-5769, 71st RQS (KING16)
AE57B4 – P-8A, 168848, VP-26
AE57BF – P-8A, 168859, VP-26 (TRIDENT 21 on ATC)
AE57BF – P-8A, 168859, VP-5 (MADFOX9)
AE57C8 – P-8A, 169003, VP-5 (MADFOX3)
AE57C8 – P-8A, 169003, VP-5 (MADFX32)
AE57C8 – P-8A, 169003, VP-5 (MADFX77)
AE57CA – P-8A, 169005, VP-8 (TIGER 06 on ATC)
AE57D0 – P-8A, 169011, VP-5 (MADFOX 88 on ATC)
AE57D0 – P-8A, 169011, VP-5/CPRW-11 (GRIFN13)
AE57D4 – HC-130J, 2010, CGAS Elizabeh City
AE58B5 – MC-12S, 11-00268, 224th MI Bn (SHADY 21 on ATC)
AE58B5 – MC-12S, 11-00268, 224th MI Bn (SHADY 29 on ATC)
AE58B5 – MC-12S, 11-00268, 224th MI Bn (SHADY 51 on ATC)
AE5C56 – P-8A, 169324, VP-30 (VVLL818)
AE5C58 – P-8A, 169326, VP-30 (VVLL826)
AE5C5A – P-8A, 169328, VP-30 (VVLL881)
AE5C5A – P-8A, 169328, VP-30 (VVLL889)
AE5C60 – P-8A, 169334, VP-30 (VVLL850)
AE5C60 – P-8A, 169334, VP-30 (VVLL867)
AE5C61 – P-8A, 169335, VP-30 (VVLL801)
AE5C63 – P-8A, 169337, VP-16 (TALON19)
AE5C63 – P-8A, 169337, VP-16 (TALON90)

The President’s View on our History and Apologies

Last week, President Trump addressed Naval Academy graduates and made a statement about our History and apologizing for America.  About our History, he said: “They’ve forgotten that our ancestors trounced an empire, tamed a continent, and triumphed over the worst evils in history.”

“Our ancestors trounced an empire…” We didn’t gain our independence from the British Empire alone, nor did we do it in a vacuum. We did it with considerable assistance from other world powers, notably France and Spain. Furthermore, we did it within the context of a struggle between empires; Britain on one side and the Spanish and French on the other. In addition to fighting in the American Colonies, there was fighting in South America and Europe. If the British didn’t have to worry about the Spanish and French, and losing Gibraltar in particular, the American Revolution may not have been successful.

“…tamed a continent…” We didn’t so much as tame a continent as forcefully settle it and in some cases steal it. When the French, British, and Spanish began to colonize this continent, it wasn’t devoid of people; it was populated by Native Americans. Over the course of our Nation’s History, we treated Native Americans poorly and at time inhumanely. We forced them farther and farther west through the use of physical force and treaties, some of which were dishonest. The colonization of the east coast, the settling of the west, and Manifest Destiny weren’t always high points in our History.

“…triumphed over the worst evils in history.” Yes, we triumphed over evil, but we didn’t do that on our own and we also aligned ourselves with evil at times. World War II is an example. There is no doubt that Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan in World War II were evil, but we did not and could not have defeated them alone. We were latecomers to the war, with the British and Russians standing against Germany after the fall of France. In our History, the war for Western Europe dominates the story, but it was the Russians who bled Germany white on the Eastern Front. It’s also worth mentioning here that Stalin was just as evil as Hitler; both were responsible for the death of millions.

This is not to take away from our accomplishments or to say that our History is all negative. It’s not! We’ve done great things and hopefully we’ll continue to do great things. We just need to have a more realistic and pragmatic view of what we’ve done. We need to take a balanced look at our History, recognize what we did right, acknowledge our mistakes and wrongdoings, and let those lessons learned influence how we move forward.

He later stated “We are not going to apologize for America. We are going to stand up for America.” It’s important to recognize that America has done wrong and made mistakes. Just a few examples are our treatment of Native Americans, Slavery, the Internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, and the dictators/strongmen we chose to back during the Cold War. We should not only acknowledge when we’ve done wrong, we should own up to it and learn from it. The honorable thing to do is to apologize when we’ve done the wrong thing or made the wrong decision. We can’t expect others to do the same to us when we’re not willing to make amends. We must also accept that we’ve done wrong, take it to heart, and learn from it so that we don’t make the same mistake in the future. Apologizing for our wrongs and standing up for our country are not mutually exclusive.

Those statements summarize how President Trump and his supporters view our History and how they believe we should conduct ourselves in the world. Those are simplistic views which negatively impact our decision making as a country. We need to realize we needed help from others and recognize we will continue to need it in the future. We must realize that just as we have done great things, we have also done wrong. We must keep a balanced view of our History, maintaining pride in our accomplishments while acknowledging and learning from our wrongs and our mistakes. The Cambridge English Dictionary defines hubris as “an extreme and unreasonable feeling of pride and confidence in yourself.” That is exactly what President Trump’s view of our History is. Hubris is not a strength, it is a weakness. The hubris of Trump’s America could very well harmful to our future.

Sentry Savannah Recap; 23 May 2018

Savannah – I got back into Savannah from Brunswick yesterday morning just in time to catch the last sorties of the latest Sentry Savannah exercise. It proved to be an interesting morning, with flights of F-15s, F-16s, F-22s, and T-38s being controlled by an E-3 and supported by two KC-135s. After the intercepts were over, a flight of F-22s returned to Langley while the other flights returned to their home base or to Savannah-Hilton Head IAP. After lunch, the rest of the F-22As and the T-38s began returning to Langley as a C-40 began picking up support personnel.

Below is a list of frequencies and callsigns in use during this iteration of Sentry Savannah. I don’t have any photographs to post this time since I wasn’t in town very much and when I was the weather wasn’t very cooperative.

119.100/257.800 – Savannah IAP Tower
124.975/279.575 – Hunter AAF Tower
126.200/285.425 – Hunter AAF Base Ops
120.400/353.775 – Savannah Approach/Departure
125.300/371.875 – Savannah Approach/Departure
118.400/307.225 – Savannah Approach/Departure

256.875/135.450 – Jax Center Keystone Ultra High
277.400/126.750 – Jax Center Brunswick Low
281.550 – Jax Center Georgetown High
282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
285.650/126.125 – Jax Center Statesboro High
290.350/132.425 – Jax Center Hunter Ultra High
306.300/133.450 – Jax Center Florence Low
317.550/134.375 – Jax Center Charleston Low
319.200/127.875 – Jax Center Aiken High
346.300/133.300 – Jax Center Moultrie Ultra High
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Allendale/Savannah Low

120.950/284.500 – SEALORD North Primary
313.700 – SEALORD North Secondary
133.950/267.500 – SEALORD South Primary

288.400 – NORAD Discrete; Check-In
293.600 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
282.600 – AWACS Discrete; Intercepts
254.200 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling
265.400 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling
274.400 – Aerial Refueling
278.000 – Aerial Refueling

228.400 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA

237.000 – ADC Ops; 192nd FW “RAPTOR Ops,” 71st FTS “IRON Ops”
139.2125 ($293) – ADC; 192nd FW/71st FTS MOC
233.525 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
257.075 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
262.025 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
296.900 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
235.900 – 71st FTS Air-to-Air
320.600 – 71st FTS Air-to-Air, Fight Common

251.250 – 125th FW Ops
234.800 – 125th FW Aux 5
253.700 – 125th FW Aux 6
314.200 – 125th FW Aux 7

311.200 – 55th FS Ops
141.675 – 55th FS Air-to-Air
141.900 – 55th FS Air-to-Air
143.600 – 55th FS Air-to-Air

320.525 – 79th FS Ops
138.150 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
141.150 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
141.700 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
143.200 – 79th FS Air-to-Air

298.500 – Heard in use by another listener between 192nd FW/95th FS flights

BASH (F-22A, 192nd FW)
CORONA (F-22A, 192nd FW)
DEMON (F-22A, 192nd FW)
PANAMA (F-22A, 192nd FW)
RECAP (F-22A, 192nd FW)
SATAN (F-22A, 192nd FW)
SLAM (F-22A, 192nd FW)

IRON (T-38, 71st FTS)
MARLIN (T-38, 71st FTS)
MIG (T-38, 71st FTS)
VODKA (T-38, 71st FTS)
VOODOO (T-38, 71st FTS)

FANG (F-15C, 125th FW)
GATOR (F-15C, 125th FW)
JAGS (F-15C, 125th FW)

CONAN (F-16CM, 55th FS)
DUDE (F-16CM, 55th FS
SPIDER (F-16CM, 55th FS)
VOODOO (F-16CM, 55th FS)

DECAY (F-16CM, 79th FS)
DIESEL (F-16CM, 79th FS)
HELLCAT (F-16CM, 79th FS)
SCAR (F-16CM, 79th FS)
SLASH (F-16CM, 79th FS)
TURBAN (F-16CM, 79th FS)
WILD (F-16CM, 79th FS)

BONES (F-22A, 95th FS)
HEARSE (F-22A, 95th FS)

KEYS 83 (KC-135R, 58-0120, 186th ARW)
EXPO 81 (KC-135T, 58-0086, 141st ARW)
WYLIE 61 (KC-135R, 57-1427, 190th AW)
WYLIE 61 (KC-135R, 62-3572, 190th AW)

DOGHOUSE (325th FW Schoolhouse)
SENTRY 06/GOLIATH (E-3G, 78-0576, 960th ACCS)
HUNTRESS (NORAD EADS)
DRAGON (RTO)

BOXER 42 (C-40C, 02-0201, 113th Wing)

Sentry Savannah Update; 16 May 2018

SavannahYesterday, I posted about a Sentry Savannah exercise being underway out of the Savannah Air Dominance Center. Yesterday’s activity, despite being cut short by bad weather during the afternoon sortie, was far bigger than Tuesday’s activity and included participation by F-16s from the 55th and 79th Fighter Squadrons from Shaw AFB as well as F-22s from the 95th FS from Tyndall AFB. A 186th ARW KC-135 from Meridian, Mississippi also participated as tanker support for the afternoon sorties. As a result, the callsign/frequency list is greatly expanded. The callsign MARLIN has also been confirmed as 71st FTS T-38s by a Langley area listener and another listener contributed 298.500 as an air-to-air frequency in use; as always, if you have additions or corrections, please let me know in the comments below.

119.100/257.800 – Savannah IAP Tower
124.975/279.575 – Hunter AAF Tower
126.200/285.425 – Hunter AAF Base Ops
120.400/353.775 – Savannah Approach/Departure
125.300/371.875 – Savannah Approach/Departure
118.400/307.225 – Savannah Approach/Departure

256.875/135.450 – Jax Center Keystone Ultra High
277.400/126.750 – Jax Center Brunswick Low
281.550 – Jax Center Georgetown High
282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
285.650/126.125 – Jax Center Statesboro High
290.350/132.425 – Jax Center Hunter Ultra High
306.300/133.450 – Jax Center Florence Low
317.550/134.375 – Jax Center Charleston Low
319.200/127.875 – Jax Center Aiken High
346.300/133.300 – Jax Center Moultrie Ultra High
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Allendale/Savannah Low

120.950/284.500 – SEALORD North Primary
313.700 – SEALORD North Secondary
133.950/267.500 – SEALORD South Primary

288.400 – NORAD Discrete; Check-In
293.600 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; Intercepts
254.200 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling
274.400 – Aerial Refueling
278.000 – Aerial Refueling

228.400 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA

237.000 – ADC Ops; 192nd FW “RAPTOR Ops,” 71st FTS “IRON Ops”
139.2125 ($293) – ADC; 192nd FW/71st FTS Support Crews
233.525 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
257.075 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
262.025 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
296.900 – 192nd FW Air-to-Air
235.900 – 71st FTS Air-to-Air
320.600 – 71st FTS Air-to-Air, Fight Common

251.250 – 125th FW Ops
234.800 – 125th FW Aux 5
253.700 – 125th FW Aux 6
314.200 – 125th FW Aux 7

311.200 – 55th FS Ops
141.675 – 55th FS Air-to-Air
141.900 – 55th FS Air-to-Air
143.600 – 55th FS Air-to-Air

320.525 – 79th FS Ops
141.150 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
141.700 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
143.200 – 79th FS Air-to-Air

298.500 – Heard in use by another listener between 192nd FW/95th FS flights

BASH (F-22A, 192nd FW)
DEMON (F-22A, 192nd FW)
RECAP (F-22A, 192nd FW)
SATAN (F-22A, 192nd FW)

MARLIN (T-38, 71st FTS)
MIG (T-38, 71st FTS)
VODKA (T-38, 71st FTS)
VOODOO (T-38, 71st FTS)

FANG (F-15C, 125th FW)
GATOR (F-15C, 125th FW)

CONAN (F-16CM, 55th FS)
DUDE (F-16CM, 55th FS
SPIDER (F-16CM, 55th FS)
VOODOO (F-16CM, 55th FS)

DIESEL (F-16CM, 79th FS)
SLASH (F-16CM, 79th FS)
TURBAN (F-16CM, 79th FS)
WILD (F-16CM, 79th FS)

BONES (F-22A, 95th FS)
HEARSE (F-22A, 95th FS)

EXPO 81 (KC-135T, 58-0086, 141st ARW)
WYLIE 61 (KC-135R, 62-3572, 190th AW)

DOGHOUSE (325th FW Schoolhouse)
HUNTRESS (NORAD EADS)
DRAGON (RTO)

The F-16s from Shaw AFB and F-22s from Tyndall AFB operated from their own fields and did not use the facilities at Savannah IAP. The 186th ARW KC-135 also operated out of its home field and didn’t use Hunter AAF.

Book Review: Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway: The Japanese Story of the Battle of Midway by Jonathan Parshall and Anthony Tully

18663139A few years ago, I read Craig L. Symond’s The Battle of Midway (Pivotal Moments in American History) and saw Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway: The Japanese Story of the Battle of Midway by Jonathan Parshall and Anthony Tully referenced in it. I took a look at the book on Amazon and it had a plain simple cover, giving it the feeling of an academic work, so I added it to my reading list but didn’t put it very high on the list. Recently, I finally got around to reading it.

Shattered Sword presents a new way of looking at the Battle of Midway. It is well researched and well documented with extensive endnotes and a lengthy bibliography. It is detailed yet captivating. Most of all, it presents strong arguments, backs up those arguments with documented sources, and effectively turns the traditional narrative of the Battle of Midway on its ear. The authors explore doctrine, strategy, planning, and tactics from the Japanese perspective; in doing so, they don’t just challenge the conventional wisdom about the battle and its after effects; to borrow from the title, it shatters them.

To put it mildly, this book is not what I thought it was. It is not a dry academic work, it is well written in a witty, conversational style. You’re not only getting a completely new understanding of the battle, you’re being entertained. It truly is hard to put this book down. Very seldom do you come across a book that presents an all-new way of looking at a historical event, but this book fits that bill. I’ve purposely not included any of Shattered Swords’ conclusions in order not to spoil the book. Buy it read it, you won’t be disappointed and you’ll come away with a whole new understanding of one of World War II’s important battles. I also think that those interested in military history can come away with important lessons, one of them being not to apply one side’s doctrine and operational practices to its opponent, analyze both sides’ actions in the light of their respective doctrines. It’s helpful to have about the Battle of Midway previously and have an understanding of how the US Navy fought the battle, but this truly is a five-star book and one that anyone interested in the Pacific Theater of World War II must read.