Book Review: The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789 by Robert Middlekauff

51K0UIFOzgL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789 by Robert Middlekauff is a long book, but well worth reading. It’s comprehensive and detailed. It is well documented with footnotes. It also has excellent bibliography section with information for further reading. It’s not a political history or a military history of the war, it incorporates both. It doesn’t just tell you what happened during the American Revolution, it tells you why it happened. A considerable portion of the book, almost 1/3 of it, covers the years preceding the Revolution and explains not only what brought British Colonists to come to the decision to break away from the British Empire, but what caused the British Government to make the decisions that pushed the colonists to the breaking point. Additionally, Middlekauff covers the years immediately after the Revolution, explaining the Constitutional Convention, the deliberations and negotiations within it, and the subsequent ratification process.

This is the best overview of the American Revolution that I’ve read. I don’t see how you could possibly get any more detailed without turning it into a multi-volume work (it’s already part of a multi-volume set – the Oxford History of the United States). The only thing I would have liked to have seen was bit more inclusion of the Spanish involvement in the American Revolution, but other than that it’s hard to find anything negative about this book. For anyone wanting an in-depth look at the why, what, and how of the American Revolution, this is the book. Anyone with an interest in US History should add it to their reading list.

Choosing a Scanner for the Coastal Georgia Area

One of the questions I get on a regular basis is about what kind of scanner to buy. Until this year, I didn’t have any experience with Whistler’s scanners, so it was a question that I was uncomfortable asking. All I could truthfully do was pass along my experiences with Uniden’s equipment and why I like their radios. Now that I have some experience with Whistler’s TRX-1 and TRX-2, I feel more qualified to answer the question. Most people who ask me that question are interested in Public Safety communications so my suggestions here will be based on that and the assumption that you’re going to be using it in the counties and communities along the Georgia coast.

Before making a decision about which radio to buy, you have to determine what type of radio systems you’ll be listening to. Are the radio systems you’ll be listening to be conventional or trunked? Will they be analog or digital? If they’re digital, are they P25, DMR, or NXDN? The best place to find answers to these questions is at RadioReference.com; go to the Georgia database and look at each county you’re interested in scanning to see what they’re using. In our case, the counties along and just off of the Georgia coast use a combination of digital trunking and analog conventional radio systems. Bryan, Chatham, Effingham, Liberty, and Glynn counties use the SEGARRN trunking system, which is a regional multi-site P25 Motorola trunking system. Brantley, Camden, Charlton, Long, McIntosh, and Wayne counties use analog conventional radio systems. None of the public safety agencies in those counties are currently using DMR or NXDN.

It’s worth taking a break here to mention that law enforcement dispatch channels for most agencies in Chatham County and Glynn County are encrypted. That means you won’t be able to hear most law enforcement agencies in Chatham County when they’re talking to dispatch and with the exception of Glynn County PD’s primary dispatch channel, you won’t be able to hear most of Glynn County PD’s channels and none of Brunswick PD’s channels. There is a steady trend toward encryption in law enforcement communications and it’s illegal to decrypt encrypted communications. Please don’t use the comments section below to debate encryption, it is what it is.

Now you need to determine whether you want a handheld scanner that you can carry around with you, a desktop scanner to leave on an end table or desk, or a mobile scanner for your car. Most people will go with either a handheld scanner or a desktop scanner. My suggestion is usually to go with a handheld scanner, it gives you more versatility because you can carry it with you wherever you go and you can always put it on your end table or desk and plug into the wall to keep from using up its batteries.

The next thing you have to do is acquaint yourself with the radios available, what they do well, and what they don’t do well. Below are the scanners currently available that I have experience with along with a description and what each does well and doesn’t do well. Depending upon where you buy the radio from, you’re looking at a retail price of $400 to $500. I’ve included a link to each on Amazon, but there are plenty of other places you can order them from including ScannerMaster and amateur radio stores.

 

Uniden Home Patrol 2

  • The Home Patrol 2 is designed for desktop use, but it can also be used as a mobile scanner. It has a large display that gives you a lot of information in a very readable form.
  • It comes pre-programmed with a national database; all you have to do is enter your location and tell it what types of communications/agencies that you want to listen to.
  • It has a very easy to use touch screen interface; if you can use a touchscreen GPS in your car or a smartphone, you can use the Home Patrol 2.
  • It does not receive DMR or NXDN systems.
  • It comes with software that will update the scanner’s national database and firmware to keep it current and up to date and you can also use it to create custom programming files for the radio if you so wish. Uniden has also made their protocols available to third-party developers and there are a number of options that make programming those custom files easier and offer computer control/logging of the radio.

 

Uniden BCD436HP

  • The BCD436HP is a handheld scanner.
  • It comes pre-programmed with a national database; all you have to do is enter your location and tell it what types of communications/agencies that you want to listen to.
  • Its user interface will take some getting used to. Once you get used to its menus and the how to navigate through them using the tuning knob and keypad, it’s fairly intuitive to use.
  • It will receive DMR or NXDN systems, but the capability comes at an added price. You have to do a $60 upgrade to add each, so if you add the capability to do both, you’re adding another $120 to the price of the radio. They don’t have to be done as soon as you buy the radio and you don’t have to them at the same time, so you can spread the additional cost over time. On the other hand, you don’t have to do either if you don’t have the need for them (and to listen to public safety in this area, you don’t)
  • It does a great job on P25 trunking systems but not as good a job as the Whistler scanners on DMR systems. Recent firmware updates have given it the capability receive NXDN systems but I haven’t had the opportunity to put it to the test yet.
  • It comes with software that will update the scanner’s national database and firmware to keep it current and up to date and you can also use it to create custom programming files for the radio if you so wish. Uniden has also made their protocols available to third-party developers and there are a number of options that make programming those custom files easier and offer computer control/logging of the radio.

 

Uniden BCD536HP

  • The BCD536HP is the desktop/mobile version of the BCD436HP with a few added features.
  • It comes pre-programmed with a national database; all you have to do is enter your location and tell it what types of communications/agencies that you want to listen to.
  • Its user interface will take some getting used to. Once you get used to its menus and the how to navigate through them using the tuning knob and keypad, it’s fairly intuitive to use.
  • It will receive DMR or NXDN systems, but the capability comes at an added price. You have to do a $60 upgrade to add each, so if you add the capability to do both, you’re adding another $120 to the price of the radio. They don’t have to be done as soon as you buy the radio and you don’t have to them at the same time, so you can spread the additional cost over time. On the other hand, you don’t have to do either if you don’t have the need for them (and to listen to public safety in this area, you don’t)
  • It does a great job on P25 trunking systems but not as good a job as the Whistler scanners on DMR systems. Recent firmware updates have given it the capability receive NXDN systems but I haven’t had the opportunity to put it to the test yet.
  • It comes with software that will update the scanner’s national database and firmware to keep it current and up to date and you can also use it to create custom programming files for the radio if you so wish. Uniden has also made their protocols available to third-party developers and there are a number of options that make programming those custom files easier and offer computer control/logging of the radio.

 

Whistler TRX-1

  • The TRX-1 is a handheld scanner.
  • It comes pre-programmed with a national database; all you have to do is enter your location and tell it what types of communications/agencies that you want to listen to.
  • Its user interface will take some getting used to. You will have to get used to navigating through its menus with the keypad. In my opinion, it isn’t quite as intuitive as Uniden’s interface and some actions require more keypress and menu navigation than the Unidens do.
  • It will receive DMR and NXDN systems out of the box, with no additional cost.
  • It does a great job on DMR and NXDN systems but not such a great job on P25 trunking systems (particularly 700/800 MHz systems). In side-by-side tests, I’ve noticed that it will miss some transmissions that the Uniden radios don’t.
  • Whistler’s software for the TRX-1 will update the scanner’s national database and firmware to keep it current and up to date and you can also use it to create custom programming files for the radio if you so wish. It is, however, a bit clunky and slow and Whistler has chosen not to make its protocols available to third-party developers.

 

Whistler TRX-2

  • The TRX-2 is the desktop/mobile version of the TRX-1
  • It comes pre-programmed with a national database; all you have to do is enter your location and tell it what types of communications/agencies that you want to listen to.
  • Its user interface will take some getting used to. You will have to get used to navigating through its menus with the keypad. In my opinion, it isn’t quite as intuitive as Uniden’s interface and some actions require more keypress and menu navigation than the Unidens do. This makes it less desirable as a mobile scanner.
  • It will receive DMR and NXDN systems out of the box, with no additional cost.
  • It does a great job on DMR and NXDN systems but not such a great job on P25 trunking systems (particularly 700/800 MHz systems). In side-by-side tests, I’ve noticed that it will miss some transmissions that the Uniden radios don’t.
  • Whistler’s software for the TRX-2 will update the scanner’s national database and firmware to keep it current and up to date and you can also use it to create custom programming files for the radio if you so wish. It is, however, a bit clunky and slow and Whistler has chosen not to make its protocols available to third-party developers.

 

Now that we know something about the radios, we can make a decision on which one to purchase. Going back to the beginning, we established that Public Safety agencies in our area use either P25 trunking systems or conventional analog systems. As far as the conventional analog systems go, the Uniden and Whistler radios handle them equally well. As far as I’m concerned, the decision is made when you look at P25 capability. The Unidens simply outperform the Whistlers on those systems, especially when they’re 700/800 MHz systems, which is what the SEGARRN system is. If you plan on traveling with your scanner to areas that use DMR or NXDN systems, the Unidens will do good enough to get you by on a temporary basis.

Which Uniden radio should you go with? That depends on how you plan to use it. If you just want a scanner to sit on your end table or desk, I would go with either the Home Patrol 2 or BCD536HP. If you want to go with a handheld scanner, I would go with the BCD436HP. If you want to put a scanner in your car, once again I would go with either the Home Patrol 2 or the BCD536HP. In choosing between the Home Patrol 2 and the BCD536HP, I think the main consideration would be your experience level followed by how much room you have to mount the radio in. If you’re a novice user, I would suggest the Home Patrol 2 because its user interface is much simpler to understand and use. If you’re more experienced, you may want to go with BCD536HP. The Home Patrol 2 will also fit in a smaller space than the BCD536HP.  If you plan on traveling with your radio, the BCD436HP and BCD536HP do offer you the capability to add DMR and NXDN reception if you need it.

There are 2 other Uniden options that I have not discussed because they are radios that I have no experience with – those are the BCD325P2 handheld scanner and the BCD996P2 desktop/mobile scanner. They are essentially the next generation of Uniden’s older BCD396XT BCD996XT scanners. They offer P25 Phase II reception just like all of the radios above do and are also upgradable for DMR reception. They’re slightly less expensive than the radios above but they also don’t come with pre-programmed databases. If you buy one of these, you’ll have to program it with the radios systems you want to listen to. I have used the BCD396XT and if these two radios perform anything like it does, they will be excellent performers. If you’re a more experienced user who wouldn’t have much problem programming them, you may want to consider them, but if you’re a novice user, you may want to keep your eyes on the BCD436HP, BCD536HP, or Home Patrol 2.

I hope you don’t come away from this post with the idea that the Whistlers are bad radios because they aren’t. Whistler simply approaches the task at hand with a different method than Uniden does. The two brands do different things well and it just so happens that the things that Uniden does well fit our area better. If we were surrounded by DMR and NXDN systems rather than P25 trunking systems, my suggestion would have been the Whistler radios instead.

By no means did I get into the specifics of each radio and all the bells and whistles each one comes with, but hopefully I went over enough to help you make a decision on which radio to buy if you’re in the market for one.

Correction:  I initially posted that the BC325P2 and BCD996P2 were NXDN upgradable, but they are not. I’ve corrected the text above and I apologize if I’ve caused any confusion.

Whistler TRX-2 Added to the Mobile Station and Further Observations on the Whistler TRX Scanners

Earlier this year, I bought a Whistler TRX-1 handheld scanner. My experiences with it over the last few months recently led me to add a TRX-2 to my mobile station. Specifically, a trip to northeast Georgia, a trip to Fernandina Beach and Jacksonville, Florida, and using the TRX-1 in the shack to gather P25 conventional UIDs have further shaped my opinion of Whistler’s two flagship scanners. I definitely prefer Uniden’s user interface and I’m still not pleased with the P25 trunking performance (particularly in the 700/800 MHz band) of Whistler’s TRX line, but they do other things quite well, so the TRX-2 is a good tool to add to the mobile station.

The Uniden Home Patrol 2 remains in the mobile station; the Whistler TRX-2 has joined it to give the station added capability. The strengths of the Home Patrol 2 are its simple, touch screen user interface and superior P25 trunking performance so it will handle Aviation, MilCom, and P25 trunking duties. It’s inconvenient at best to manually tune a channel on a TRX-1 or TRX-2 under normal conditions and practically impossible to do it while driving. I’ve found that when I’m monitoring Aviation or MilCom communications, it’s not unusual to manually tune to a channel to follow communications, so the touch screen and user interface of the Home Patrol 2 makes this no more difficult than changing channels on the car stereo. Doing the same with a TRX-1 or TRX-2 would involve so many button presses and navigation through menus that it would be too distracting to do while driving and therefore just too dangerous. The strengths of the TRX-2 are its DMR and NXDN capabilities and its ability to display P25 conventional radio IDs (UIDs) so it will handle conventional public safety, DMR, and NXDN scanning. The Home Patrol 2 offers neither DMR or NXDN reception and I’ve recently found myself traveling through areas that use those modes, so I needed to add something to the station that would add them. I just haven’t been satisfied with the DMR performance of my Uniden BCD436HP and BCD536HP (and NXDN capability has only recently been added to them) so I couldn’t see mounting either one. On the other hand, the TRX-1 has done a great job on DMR and NXDN and also displays radio IDs on P25 conventional frequencies (which the Uniden radios don’t do), so a TRX-2 was the radio to add.

IMG_20180501_081700_resize
Radios in the mobile station: from top to bottom: Yaesu FT-8800, Uniden HP2, Whistler TRX-2 on the bottom left, Yaesu FT-857D on the bottom right.

With the exception of the Home Patrol 2, mobile scanners are large and bulky relative to modern car interiors. In that area, the TRX-2 also came with another positive: it comes out of the box with a detachable control head, the BCD536HP does not. I put the radio itself under the driver’s seat and mounted the control head (as seen in the photo above) on a RAM mount under the Home Patrol 2 and next to my Yaesu FT-857D mobile HF radio.

Since I first offered my observations on the TRX-1, further use and experience with it and now the TRX-2 have modified some observations and led to others.

IMG_20180123_061509_resize
The Whistler TRX-1 (center) flanked by the Uniden BCD396XT (left) and Uniden BCD436HP (right) for size and display comparison (disregard the talkgroup showing on the 396, the other two radios are set up to skip that talkgroup)

TRX-1/2 Positives

  • I really haven’t had the opportunity to compare the NXDN performance of the Uniden and Whistler radios, but so far my experience is that the Whistler TRX-1 and TRX-2 are easier to use with DMR systems and perform better than the Unidens on DMR systems. Additionally, with the Uniden BCD436HP and BCD536HP, it’s critical that you know the logical order of the frequencies in a DMR trunking system in order to program it, you don’t with the Whistlers.
  • The TRX-1 and TRX-2 receive both DMR and NXDN out of the box. The Uniden Home Patrol 2 does neither and there are separate DMR and NXDN paid upgrades for the BCD436HP and BCD536HP. The upgrades cost $60 apiece, so if you want to add both DMR and NXDN capability to your 436 or 536, you’re adding $120 to a $400-500 scanner. This is something that Uniden intends to carry over with their new SDS-100 and something that they really should reconsider because it significantly increases the price of the radios compared to the Whistlers.
  • The TRX-1 and TRX-2 offer the ability to stop on encrypted transmissions while the Uniden BCD436HP and BCD536HP don’t. The 436 and 536 skip encrypted transmissions, but you can set the TRX-1 and TRX-2 to not ignore encrypted transmissions and pass the encryption noise or a busy-tone similar to a telephone busy signal. This is particularly helpful if you’re searching for frequencies or talkgroups or want to know when an encrypted frequency or talkgroup is active.

TRX-1/2 Negatives

  • The Whistler TRX-1 and TRX-2 displays just don’t display as much information as the Uniden Home Patrol 2, BCD436HP, or BCD536HP displays do. The Uniden displays are larger, offer longer and more useful alphanumeric tags, and to me are just more readable. On the other hand, those with vision impairment may find the larger, bolder type of the Whistler display easier to read.
  • The Whistler user interface is more complicated than the Uniden user interface, particularly when used as a mobile scanner. Manually tuning a channel (or in Whistler’s parlance, an object) is far more involved than either the BCD436HP or BCD536HP, which offer tuning knobs and more involved than the Home Patrol 2 which you navigate through a touchscreen.
  • The TRX-1 and TRX-2 just don’t track P25 trunking systems, as well as the Uniden scanners, do, particularly in the 700/800 MHz range. In side-by-side tests, I’ve watched the Whistlers miss transmissions that the Unidens don’t. With both the TRX-1 and TRX-2, I’ve found that I have to adjust the data decoding thresholds on P25 trunking systems in the programming software to improve system tracking and even then they tend to miss transmissions.

In my first post of observations on the TRX-1, I wrote about how much of a problem the programming software for the TRX-1 is. Although the TRX-2 uses a separate program from the TRX-2, it’s basically the same program optimized for the TRX-2. The interface is still clunky and counter-intuitive to most Windows-based software. One of the main issues is that you can’t cut and paste information from one program to another, you can only utilize the software’s import feature. Another of my complaints about the Whistler software was about its transfer speed. When you connect the radio to the computer to program it, the transfer speed is astonishingly slow compared to connecting the Unidens to a computer to do the same. I have discovered that removing the SD card from the TRX-2 and inserting into my computer’s card reader significantly increases the transfer speed. With the TRX-2, that’s not a huge problem as the SD card inserts into the radio behind the control head. With the TRX-1 it is a problem because its micro SD card inserts into the side of the scanner under the battery compartment cover which is in turn under the radio’s protective case. It just isn’t as convenient or easy to remove the TRX-1’s memory card as it is to remove the TRX-2’s memory card. One design change I would suggest to the TRX-2 is relocating the memory card slot to the control head since they’ve designed the radio with remote mounting the head in mind. The rest of the radio, particularly in a mobile installation, isn’t always in the most easily accessible place.

One thing that hasn’t changed since I wrote about my observations on the TRX-1 is the lack of aftermarket software. Aftermarket software from companies such as Butel and ProScan is available for Uniden’s software and even though Uniden offers their own software for their radios, they cooperate with the aftermarket companies. Whistler does not; they have refused to share their programming protocols with outside software developers, so you’re stuck with their software. When I wrote about that in February, my opinion was that I probably wouldn’t have bought a TRX-1 if I had known about how bad the software was and that third-party software wasn’t available for the TRX-1. I have since come around to the opinion that some of the benefits of the radio in regards to DMR/NXDN performance and the ability to read P25 radio IDs outweigh the lack of third-party software. Third-party software or better factory software is still desired and I have made my opinion known to Whistler on several occasions.

When comparing the Whistlers with the Unidens, it really isn’t like comparing Chevrolet and Ford or Coke and Pepsi. It doesn’t come down to brand preference, Whistler’s scanners and Uniden’s scanners follow different methods of doing a similar task and don’t do all tasks well. When making a decision about which one to buy, you need to consider what you’ll be using it for and what you’ll be listening to. I have written a blog post that considers which radio you might want to choose if you live in the coastal Georgia area.

Crash of 156th Airlift Wing WC-130H in Savannah, GA

Savannah – I wasn’t in Savannah or awake to hear any of the communications surrounding the Puerto Rico Air National Guard 156th Airlift Wing WC-130 that crashed earlier this week, but still thought I needed to write up some sort of post about it. Before I go any further, my condolences go out to the family, friends, and fellow servicemembers of the aircraft’s crew. After all that Puerto Rico has gone through in the last year and all that ANG has done to serve and support the people of Puerto Rico, it’s terribly sad to lose them this way.

 

DAWG03_4_resize
In remembrance of the crew of WC-130H 65-0968 which crashed in Savannah, GA on 2 May 2018: “…with silent, lifting mind I’ve trod the high untrespassed sanctity of space, put out my hand and touched the face of God.” (photo not of 65-0968)

 

News Reports:

WC-130H 65-0968 crashed on 2 May 2018 shortly after departing from Savannah International Airport. It crashed onto Georgia Highway 21 in Port Wentworth; news reports and the location of the crash near the approach end of Runway 28 indicate that the crew was trying to get the aircraft back to Savannah IAP after experiencing some sort of problem on or after takeoff. Unfortunately, they didn’t make it back; 65-0968 spiraled into the highway before they could make it back and sadly all nine of the crew aboard perished. The crew was able to keep the aircraft from crashing into any homes or businesses in the area and by the grace of God, there was no traffic on Highway 21 under 65-0968 when it crashed. Emergency response from the Air National Guard 165th Airlift Wing Crash/Fire units at Savannah International Airport quickly responded as did surrounding Fire Departments and Ambulance Services. Air National Guard personnel from the 165th AW and USAF personnel from Charleston AFB and Dover AFB are on scene conducting recovery and investigation operations. Interestingly enough, 65-0968 used to be a 165th AW aircraft prior to its assignment to the 156th AW in Puerto Rico.

Georgia Highway 21 remains closed between the Jimmy Deloach Parkway and Georgia Highway 307 and will remain so for quite awhile. The investigation will have to be completed then the remains of the aircraft removed and the area cleaned up. Then Georgia DOT will have to inspect the roadway and complete any repairs needed. DOT has set up a detour using the Jimmy DeLoach Parkway between Highway 21 and Highway 307 to re-route traffic.

This tragedy has an amateur radio connection as well. The ARRL reported that Master Sgt. Eric Circuns was amateur radio operator WP4OXB.

Coastal Georgia Military Monitoring Recap; April 2018

April was an uneventful month military monitoring-wise in the Coastal Georgia area.  There were no visiting units at the Savannah Air Dominance Center or any exercises to report. VMFA-115 and VMFA(AW)-553 deployed from MCAS Beaufort so there will be a little less F/A-18 activity to hear over the coming months.

Hunter AAF
124.975 – Tower
279.575 – Tower
121.800 – Ground
291.675 – Ground
126.200 – Base Ops
285.425 – Base Ops
309.000 – PMSV
37.975 – KNIGHTHAWK OPS (2-3 AVN, GSAB)
38.150 – 1/169 AVN “HURRICANE Ops”
345.000 – USCG AirSta Savannah Ops
157.175 – Marine VHF Ch 83, CGAS Savannah MX Control

ARMY 03749 (MH-47G, 04-03749, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03750 (MH-47G, 04-03750, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03761 (MH-47G, 05-03761, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03770 (MH-47G, 07-03770, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03786 (MH-47G, 09-03786, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20008 (MH-60M, 05-20008, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20015 (MH-60M, 05-20015, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20018 (MH-60M, 05-20018, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20209 (MH-60M, 09-20209, 3-160 SOAR)
SHADY 18 (MC-12S, 11-00268, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 29 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 37 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 68 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 68 (MC-12S, 11-00268, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 93 (MC-12S, 11-00268, 224th MI Bn)
GUARD 08080 (CH-47F, 10-08080, 1/169 AVN)
HURRICANE ## (CH-47F, 1/169 AVN)
COAST GUARD 6526 (MH-65D, 6526, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6544 (MH-65D, 6544, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6547 (MH-65D, 6547, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6567 (MH-65D, 6567, CGAS Savannah)
GUARD 72133 (UH-72A, 10-72133, 2-151 AVN GA ARNG)
COAST GUARD AUXILIARY 32BV
COAST GUARD AUXILLARY 39F (P32R, N7639F, 28605 Wings LLC)
COAST GUARD AUXILIARY 510KB (C510, N510KB, Aviation Research & Maintenance)

 

72133
ADS-B plot of GUARD 72133 (UH-72A, 10-72133, 2-151 AVN GA ARNG) inbound to Hunter AAF on 25 April 2018

 

 

Savannah IAP/CRTC
119.100 – Tower
257.800 – Tower
121.900 – Ground
348.600 – Ground
120.400 – Approach/Departure
353.775 – Approach/Departure
125.300 – Approach/Departure
371.875 – Approach/Departure
118.400 – Approach/Departure
307.225 – Approach/Departure
123.025 – Savannah Helicopter Advisory
225.750 – 165th AW CP “ANIMAL CONTROL”
173.5625 – 165th AW MOC (NAC 302)
123.200 – WCM9, Gulfstream Aerospace
128.925 – Gulfstream Service Center
130.375 – Signature Flight Support

DAWG 06 (C-130H3, 94-6706, 165th AW)
DAWG 07 (C-130H3, 94-6707, 165th AW)
DAWG 28 (C-130H3, 93-1561, 165th AW)
DAWG 61 (C-130H3, 93-1561, 165th AW)
DAWG 78 (C-130H3, 93-1561, 165th AW)
EAGLE ## (MD-500, Chatham Co)
GULFTEST 07 (G500, N502GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 07 (G600, N600G, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 11 (G650, N297GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 11 (G550, N544GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 20 (G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 27 (G650, N297GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 30 (G-V, N532SP, Gulfstream Leasing)
GULFTEST 44 (G650, N712KT, Wilmington Trust Co)
GULFTEST 52 (G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 65 (G650, N629GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 65 (G650, Gulfstream Test)
GULFTEST 69 (G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 75 (GV-SP, N50HA, Gulfstream Aerospace/Dillards)
GULFTEST 75 (G550, N544GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 83 (G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 84 (G650, Guflstream Test)
GULFTEST 88 (G650, N626GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 89 (C-37A, 99-0402, 86th AW)
GULFTEST 93 (G500, N502GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 96 (G650ER, TR-KGM, Gabon Government)
N600G (G600, N600G, Gulfstream Aerospace)
COAST GUARD 101 (C-37A, 01, CGAS Washington)

 

Fort Stewart/Wright AAF
127.350 – Marne Radio
279.625 – Marne Radio
126.250 – Wright AAF Tower
269.275 – Wright AAF Tower

CHAOS 44 (unknown)

 

Brunswick/Golden Isles Airport
123.000 – CTAF

 

Malcolm McKinnon Airport/Jekyll Island Airport
123.050 – CTAF

 

Plantation Air Park, Sylvania, GA
122.800 – CTAF

 

Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport
122.800 – CTAF

JUMPER 2 (C182, The Jumping Place)

 

Hilton Head Airport
118.975 – Tower

 

MCAS Beaufort
119.050 – Tower
342.875 – Tower
269.125 – Approach/Departure
123.700 – Approach/Departure
292.125 – Approach/Departure
125.125 – Approach/Departure
281.800 – Base Ops
264.500 – PMSV
283.400 – VMFA-115 Base
339.500 – VMFA-115 Tac 1
225.675 – VMFA-115 Tac 2
274.500 – VMFA-115 Tac 3
313.800 – VMFA-251 Base
251.400 – VMFA-251 Tac 1
343.200 – VMFAT-501 Base
326.700 – VMFAT-501 Tac 1
349.225 – VMFAT-501 Tac 2
341.825 – VMFAT-501 Tac 3
136.7750 – ATAC Air-to-Air

BLADE 2# (F/A-18A+, VMFA-115)
TBOLT 5# (F/A-18A+, VMFA-251)
SWEDE ## (F-35B, VMFAT-501)
FOX 661 (UC-12M, 163836, MCAS Beaufort)
FOX 836 (UC-12M, 163836, MCAS Beaufort)
FOX 840 (UC-12M, 163840, MCAS Beaufort)
ATAC ## (Hunter F.58 or Kfir, ATAC)

 

Jacksonville IAP
118.000 – Approach/Departure
121.300 – Approach/Departure
123.800 – Approach/Departure
124.900 – Approach/Departure
127.000 – Approach/Departure
322.400 – Approach/Departure
335.600 – Approach/Departure
351.800 – Approach/Departure
377.050 – Approach/Departure
251.250 – 125th FW Maintenance/Ops
234.800 – 125th FW Aux 5
253.700 – 125th FW Aux 6

FANG 0# (F-15C, 125th FW)
GATOR 0# (F-15C, 125th FW)

 

NAS Jacksonville/Mayport NS/Cecil Field
118.000 – Approach/Departure
121.300 – Approach/Departure
123.800 – Approach/Departure
124.900 – Approach/Departure
127.000 – Approach/Departure
322.400 – Approach/Departure
335.600 – Approach/Departure
351.800 – Approach/Departure
377.050 – Approach/Departure
310.200 – NAS Jacksonville Base Ops
264.200 – VP-26/45 Base
250.900 – HSM-40 Base
264.350 – HSM-46 Base
277.800 – Fleet Common

NAVY AC 710 (MH-60S, 167004, HSM-74)
MADFOX 02 (P-8A, 169003, VP-5)
TIGER 01 (P-8A, 169007, VP-8)
TIGER 04 (P-8A, 168758, VP-8)
TALON 01 (P-8A, VP-16)
TALON 22 (P-8A, 169337, VP-16)
TALON 33 (P-8A, 168860, VP-16)
TALON 68 (P-8A, 168762, VP-16)
TRIDENT 12 (P-8A, 169336, VP-26)
TRIDENT 36 (P-8A, 168759, VP-26)
TRIDENT 96 (P-8A, 168435, VP-26)
NAVY LL 15 (P-3C, VP-30)
NAVY LL 826 (P-8A, 169334, VP-30)
NAVY LL 838 (P-8A, 169335, VP-30)
NAVY LL 854 (P-8A, 169334, VP-30)
NAVY LL 858 (P-8A, 169335, VP-30)
NAVY LL 860 (P-8A, 168429, VP-30)
NAVY LL 877 (P-8A, 169328, VP-30)
NAVY LL 881 (P-8A, 169326, VP-30)
NAVY LL 889 (P-8A, 168429, VP-30)
NAVY LL 889 (P-8A, 169334, VP-30)
NAVY LL 891 (P-8A, 169335, VP-30)
CONVOY 4444 (C-40A, 165832, VR-58)
AIRWOLF 04 (MH-60R, HSM-40)
AIRWOLF 12 (MH-60R, HSM-40)
AIRWOLF 14 (MH-60R, HSM-40)
AIRWOLF 31 (MH-60R, HSM-40)
GUARD 20694 (HH-60M, FL ARNG)

 

TRDNT18
ADS-B plot of TRIDENT 12 (P-8A, 169336, VP-26) over the Georgia and South Carolina coast on 13 April 2018

 

Charleston AFB
120.700 – Charleston App/Dep
135.800 – Charleston App/Dep
306.925 – Charleston App/Dep
379.925 – Charleston App/Dep
134.100 – Charleston AFB “PALMETTO Ops”
349.400 – Charleston AFB “PALMETTO Ops”
123.325 – Boeing Charleston

BASCO 23 (C-17A, 07-7189, 437th/315th AW)
EAGLE 63 (C-17A, 07-7187, 15th AS)
PRIME 02 (C-17A, 02-1101, 317th AS)
PRIME 25 (C-17A, 99-0169, 317th AS)
PRIME 29 (C-17A, 10-0215, 317th AS)
TURTLE 04 (C-17A, 00-0172, 701st AS)
TURTLE 09 (C-17A, 10-0213, 701st AS)
REACH 262T (C-17A, 09-9205, 437th/315th AW)
REACH 357 (C-17A, 10-0222, 437th/315th AW)
REACH 384 (C-17A, 07-7180, 437th/315th AW)
REACH 699 (C-17A, 02-1101, 437th/315th AW)
BOEING 043 (787, G-VYNL, Virgin Atlantic Airways, Boeing Test)
BOEING 910 (787, Boeing Test)

 

Shaw AFB
125.400 – Columbia App/Dep
318.100 – Columbia App/Dep
141.775 – 55th FS Air-to-Air

MISTY 1# (F-16CM, 55th FS)

 

McEntire ANGB
125.400 – Columbia App/Dep
318.100 – Columbia App/Dep
298.300 – 169th FW “SWAMP FOX Ops”
141.825 – 169th FW V14
140.125 – 169th FW V15
143.250 – 169th FW V16

MACE ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)
VIPER ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)
DEMON ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)
STALK ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)

 

Robins AFB
293.525 – 116th/461st ACW “PEACHTREE OPS”
225.725 – JSTARS Discrete
276.075 – JSTARS Discrete
324.650 – JSTARS Discrete
372.150 – JSTARS Discrete
379.725 – JSTARS Discrete
395.150 – JSTARS Discrete

PEACH 99 (E-8C, 95-0121, 116th/461st ACW)
ROHO (E-8C backend, 116th/461st ACS)
STARGATE (E-8C backend, 02-9111, 128th ACCS)

 

Moody AFB
143.750 – 23rd FG Air-to-Air

GUNHOG 0# (A-10C, 23rd FG)

 

Ranges/Military Operating Areas
119.225 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA
228.400 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA
252.900 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA
343.750 – Bulldog MOA
354.300 – BEEFEATER ECM Range
239.000 – Moody 2 MOA

 

SEALORD (USN FACSFAC Jax)
120.950 – North Primary
133.950 – South Primary
284.500 – North Primary
267.500 – South Primary
313.700 – North Secondary
349.800 – W-137 Discrete
376.900 – W-137 Discrete
318.600 – SEALORD Discrete

 

Doubleshot (W-161/177)
127.725 – DOUBLESHOT Primary
228.275 – DOUBLESHOT Primary
258.400 – W-161/177 Discrete
279.725 – W-161/177 Discrete

 

Miscellaneous
364.200 – NORAD AICC
260.900 – NORAD Discrete
293.600 – NORAD Discrete
316.300 – NORAD Discrete
287.450 – AWACS AutoTOD
355.200 – AWACS Discrete
324.600 – AR-207
327.600 – AR-202
300.025 – 4th FW Air-to-Air
148.125 ($430) – SC CAP Lowcountry Repeater

ANX 1202 (G450, AMT-205/XC-LMF, Mexican Navy)
ARMY 01052 (UC-35B, 00-1052, OSACOM PATD)
ARMY 51267 (C-12U, 85-01267, OSACOM VA RFC)
BACKY ## (KC-135R, 916th ARW)
BAHRAIN 4 (GV-SP, A9C-BHR, Bahrain Amiri Flight)
BANDIT 11 (F-5N, VFC-111)
COAST GUARD 2303 (HC-144A, 2303, CGAS Cape Cod)
COAST GUARD 2710 (C-27J, 2710, CGAS Elizabeth City)
CODY 01 (C-130H, 93-1038, 434th AW)
CONVOY 4722 (C-40A, 165830, VR-59)
DEECEE 03 (KC-135R, 61-0307, 459th ARW)
DIXIE 5# flight (KC-135R, 117th ARW)
DREW 11 (KC-135R, 60-0353, 6th/927th ARW)
DREW 12 (KC-135T, 59-1480, 6th/927th ARW
EDDIE 62 (KC-135R, 62-3511, 121st ARW)
FIRST 71 (F-22A, 1st FW)
FROZEN 38 (C-17A, 93-0599, 3rd Wing)
GOLD 91 (KC-135R, 63-8045, 6th AMW/927th ARW)
HOUND 42 (C-146, 12-3050/N355EF, 27th SOW)
HUNTRESS (NORAD EADS)
JAPANESE AIR FORCE 001 (747, 20-1101, 701 Hikotai, JASDF)
JAPANESE AIR FORCE 002 (747, 20-1102, 701 Hikotai, JASDF)
KBAR 558 (UC-12M, 163839, MCAS New River)
LOCKHEED 5824 (C-130J, N5105A, Lockheed)
MARINE 714 (UC-35D, 166714, VMR-1)
NAVY 375 (C-37A, 166375, CFLSW Det)
OMEGA 71 (707, N707MQ, Omega Air)
PAT 104 (UC-35A, 97-00104, US Army)
PAT 285 (C-12, US Army)
PAT 347 (UC-35B, 00-01051, B/2-228 AVN)
POLO 17 (C-17A, 90-0532, 105th AW)
REACH 114 (C-17A, 06-6160, 60th AMW)
REACH 177 (C-17A, 04-4132, 305th AMW)
REACH 260T (C-5M, 85-0002, 436th AW)
REACH 301 (C-17A, 02-1107, 62nd AW)
REACH 473 (C-17A, 04-4128, 305th AMW)
REACH 779 (C-17A, 02-1110, 62nd AW)
REACH A612 (C-130J, 13-5784, 19th AW)
SENTRY 06/GOLIATH (E-3B, 79-0003, 960th ACCS)
SIEGE ## (F-15E, 4th FW)
SPAR 30 (C-37A, 01-0030, 6th AMW)
SWEET 3# (F-15E, 4th FW)
TOGA 36 (KC-10A, 87-0123, 60th AMW)
UPSET 22 (KC-135R, 58-0009, 128th ARW)
WING 32 (UC-35B, 99-00104, A/2-228 AVN)
LIFESTAR 1 (Bell 407, N407LS, Air Methods)
N239AE (Bell 206L-1, AirEvac 96 Jesup)
N269AE (Bell 206L-3, AirEvac 91 Vidalia)
N296AE (Bell 206L-1, AirEvac 95 Statesboro)
N409AE (Bell 206L-4, AirEvac 90 Douglas)
N133LN (EC-130, Air Methods)

 

PIONR10 VM714
PIONEER 10 (P-8A, 167956, VX-1) and MARINE 714 (UC-35D, 166714, VMR-1) over coastal Georgia and South Carolina on 25 April 2018

 

ARTCC
323.300/133.700 – Jax Center Baxley Low
254.325/125.375 – Jax Center Taylor Low
269.250/133.325 – Jax Center Ocala Low
269.550/124.700 – Jax Center Columbia Low
277.400/126.750 – Jax Center Brunswick Low
281.550 – Jax Center Georgetown High
282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
282.300/135.975 – Jax Center Alma High
285.650/126.125 – Jax Center Statesboro High
290.350/132.425 – Jax Center Hunter Ultra High
290.400/132.300 – Jax Center Waycross Low
307.250/126.350 – Jax Center St. Augustine High
317.600/135.750 – Jax Center Cedar Key Low
319.200/127.875 – Jax Center Aiken High
351.700/124.075 – Jax Center Summerville High
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Millen Low
379.100/127.950 – Jax Center Charleston Low
135.050 – Jax Center Meta Low/High

269.175/129.925 – Atlanta Center Burne High
273.600/123.950 – Atlanta Center Macon Low
290.375/125.825 – Atlanta Center Macon Ultra High
307.050/126.425 – Atlanta Center Dublin High
322.325/128.100 – Atlanta Center Augusta Low
353.925/125/375 – Atlanta Center Lanier High

255.400/123.650 – FSS

 

USCG
156.8000 – Marine VHF Ch. 16
157.0500 – Marine VHF Ch. 21; Sector Charleston/Station Tybee
157.1000 – Marine VHF Ch. 22
162.3250 – USCG Net 111 (NAC 293); Sector Jacksonville
163.1375 – USCG Net 113 (NAC 293); Station Tybee
164.9000 – USCG Net 118 (NAC 293); Station Brunswick
412.9750 – USCG Net 409 (NAC 293); Sector Jacksonville
413.0000 – USCG Net 410 (NAC 293); Sector Charleston